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I am very new to postgres. I got this error when try to run the following script:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION xyz(text) RETURNS INTEGER AS
'DECLARE result int;
BEGIN
    SELECT count(*) into result from tbldealercommissions
    WHERE 
    txtdealercode = $1;

    if result < 1 then returns 1; 
    else returns 2 ;
    end if;
END;
    '
LANGUAGE sql VOLATILE;

The error is

ERROR:  syntax error at or near "int"
LINE 3: 'DECLARE result int;

not sure what cause this error. Any help is appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is unsuitable:

LANGUAGE sql

use this instead:

LANGUAGE plpgsql

The syntax you are trying to use is not pure SQL language but the procedural PL/pgSQL language. In PostgreSQL you can install different languages and PL/pgSQL is only primus inter pares in that regard. This also means that you might get the error message, that this language is not installed. In that case use

CREATE LANGUAGE plpgsql;

which actives it. Depending on the version of PostgreSQL you might need superuser rights to do this step.

Have fun.

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Hi A.H, I changed language to plpgsql and got this error:ERROR: language "plpgsql" does not exist HINT: Use CREATE LANGUAGE to load the language into the database. –  Shiver Oct 6 '11 at 12:46
    
Added some explanation in the post. –  A.H. Oct 6 '11 at 13:46
1  
@Shiver: Since PostgreSQL 9.0, language PL/pgSQL is installed by default. Additionally, you can: CREATE OR REPLACE LANGUAGE plpgsql; to be sure. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 6 '11 at 15:56
    
Great thanks A.H I run create command and managed to create the function. Thanks guys for all the help. –  Shiver Oct 6 '11 at 23:27
    
Please "vote" and "accept" the usefull answers as described in the FAQ. –  A.H. Oct 7 '11 at 7:11

Not only are you using the wrong language (as noted by A.H.) but there is returns keyword, you want return. You might want to use a different delimiter to avoid running into problems with string literals in your functions, $$ is pretty common. I think your function should look more like this:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION xyz(text) RETURNS INTEGER AS $$
DECLARE result int;
BEGIN
    select count(*) into result
    from tbldealercommissions
    where txtdealercode = $1;

    if result < 1 then return 1; 
    else return 2;
    end if;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql VOLATILE;
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Additionally to what mu_is_to_short and A.H. already pointed out, you can have it much simpler. You don't need PL/pgSQL for that:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION xyz(text)
RETURNS integer AS
$$
SELECT CASE WHEN count(*) < 1 THEN 1 ELSE 2 END
  FROM tbldealercommissions
 WHERE txtdealercode = $1;
$$
LANGUAGE sql;
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Erwin, This is just simple function to learn the syntax not to do real work. We have queries running so slow in the application (select then update\insert) and I thought of using if statement to replace the queries. All I want to know is how to execute the function without errors not alternative logic. I am running the db inside a vm given to me by the client. This is my first encounter with postgres db. So if the language is not installed I guess I have to run some command to load it right? –  Shiver Oct 6 '11 at 23:13
    
Thanks Erwin, Create language solved the problem. Many thanks everyone for the prompt response. I got my first postgres function in the schema :) –  Shiver Oct 6 '11 at 23:31

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