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I'm using Spring3+JPA+Hibernate. I've tried to keep structure of the example similar to my actual code structure. Please scroll to the bottom for the actual question. Zipped maven project can be downloaded from www.esnips.com/nsdoc/da7a09c0-ce5a-4dbf-80a2-f414ea3bf333/?action=forceDL

Following is the class under test.

public class ServiceImpl implements Service {

@Autowired
private DataAccessor dataAccessor;

@Autowired
private ServiceTransactions serviceTransactions;

public Foo getFoo(long id) {
    return dataAccessor.getFoo(id);
}

public Foo createFoo(Foo foo) {
    return dataAccessor.createFoo(foo);
}

public Bar createBar(Bar bar) {
    return dataAccessor.createBar(bar);
}

@SuppressWarnings("unused")
public Foo FooifyBar(long fooId, long barId) {
    Foo foo = dataAccessor.getFoo(fooId);
    Bar bar = dataAccessor.getBar(barId);
    return serviceTransactions.fooifyBar(fooId, barId, "Error");
}

}

Following is the ServiceTransactions class.

public class ServiceTransactions {
    @Autowired
    private DataAccessor dataAccessor;

    @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.REQUIRES_NEW)
    public Foo fooifyBar(long fooId, long barId, String error) {
    Foo foo = dataAccessor.getFoo(fooId);
    Bar bar = dataAccessor.getBar(barId);
    return dataAccessor.fooifyBar(foo, bar, error);
    }
}

Following is the implementation of DataAccessor in use.

public class DataAccessorImpl implements DataAccessor {

@Autowired
private DBController controller;

@Transactional
public Foo getFoo(long id) {
    FooDao food = controller.getFoo(id);
    return convertFoodToFoo(food);
}

@Transactional
public Foo createFoo(Foo foo) {
    FooDao food = new FooDao();
    food.setName(foo.getName());
    return convertFoodToFoo(controller.createFoo(food));
}

@Transactional
public Bar getBar(long id) {
    return convertBardToBar(controller.getBar(id));
}

@Transactional
public Bar createBar(Bar bar) {
    BarDao bard = new BarDao();
    bard.setName(bar.getName());
    return convertBardToBar(controller.createBar(bard));
}

@Transactional
public Foo fooifyBar(Foo foo, Bar bar, String error) {
    return convertFoodToFoo(controller.fooBar(foo.getId(), bar.getId(), error));
}

Following is the implementation of DBController

public class DBControllerImpl implements DBController {

@PersistenceContext 
private EntityManager em;

public FooDao getFoo(long id) {
    return em.find(FooDao.class, id);
}

public FooDao createFoo(FooDao foo) {
    em.persist(foo);
    return foo;
}

public BarDao getBar(long id) {
    return em.find(BarDao.class, id);
}

public BarDao createBar(BarDao bar) {
    em.persist(bar);
    return bar;
}

public FooDao fooBar(long fooId, long barId, String error) {
    FooDao foo = em.find(FooDao.class, fooId);
    FooedBarDao fb = new FooedBarDao();
    fb.setFoo(foo);
    fb.setBar(em.find(BarDao.class, barId));
    fb.setError(error);
    em.persist(fb);

    foo.getFooedBars().add(fb);

    em.merge(foo);
    return foo;
}

And finally the test class

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(locations="/testContext.xml")
public class TestFooBar {

@Autowired
private Service service;
Foo foo;
Bar bar;

@BeforeTransaction
public void before() {
    foo = new Foo();
    foo.setName("foo");
    foo = service.createFoo(foo);
    bar = new Bar();
    bar.setName("bar");
    bar = service.createBar(bar);
}

@Test
@Transactional
public void testFooingBar() {
    service.FooifyBar(foo.getId(), bar.getId());
    Foo foo2 = service.getFoo(foo.getId());
    Assert.assertEquals(1, foo2.getFooedBars().size());
}

Now the question is the test case fails with error testFooingBar(com.test.sscce.server.TestFooBar): expected:<1> but was:<0> in the form given above. If I modify the FooifyBar method in ServiceImpl class and remove the calls to getFoo and getBar, the test case succeeds without error. This means changes made by fooifyBar are not visible to the test method, if getFoo occurs before fooifyBar. Why is that?

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2 Answers

REQUIRES_NEW doesn't mean nested transaction, spring starts another transaction suspending the one currently active. As far as the DB is concerned they are two independent transactions.

If you need a nested transaction you should use the attribute NESTED. For this to work the database and driver need to support certain features - which I don't think is widely supported.

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I did not mean nested transaction, fixed the title. As you said, the two are separate transactions, so changes from the inner transactions must be visible to the outer transaction. Even stranger fact is that if I move call to getFoo inside insertFooRelationAndUpdateBar, the test case succeeds. –  Lalit Mishra Oct 6 '11 at 12:43
    
What is the isolation level - whether changes made to the DB after a transaction has been started are visible to it or not depends on the isolation level. Also in your example it is not clear what you mean by test fails - which is the inner and outer transaction? –  gkamal Oct 6 '11 at 13:19
    
Isolation is not changed i.e. it is default. Outer transaction starts with the test method and the inner transaction starts with the insertFooRelationAndUpdateBar method which has the 'transactional' annotation with propagation=REQUIRES_NEW. By test failure, I mean the assertion fails because the relation which was added in the inner transaction is not visible to the test method. –  Lalit Mishra Oct 6 '11 at 15:01
    
The behavior is what you would get with isolation REPEATABLE_READ. Try changing the isolation level on the @Transactional in test to READ_COMMITED. With isolation REPEATABLE_READ any query that was executed in a transaction is gauranteed to return the same data, that is why when you move the getFoo into the other transaction it works. –  gkamal Oct 7 '11 at 16:32
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You're asking why changes made in one transaction aren't visible in a second transaction. This is a primary reason that transactions are used: to keep changes isolated until commit. So you're kind of asking why relational databases work the way they do.

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I am sorry that I've not been clearer about that. The inner transaction is committed (at-least the logs say so) after the end of method insertFooRelationAndUpdateBar. If getFoo is brought inside this method, same thing works. –  Lalit Mishra Oct 6 '11 at 15:49
    
Right: one transaction is committed, but the other, which started first, is ongoing. Depending on the isolation level, the ongoing first transaction won't see something done by the second transaction. Granted there are probably several other things that could be wrong. If you're looking for more concrete answers, ask a more concrete question--i.e. provide an SSCCE. –  Ryan Stewart Oct 6 '11 at 22:34
    
I've edited the question with a concrete example. And I think I get what you mean. I'll have to change the propagation for getFoo to REQUIRES_NEW, so that the retrieval also starts a new transaction which would be aware of changes made by the earlier transaction. Is there any other solution? –  Lalit Mishra Oct 7 '11 at 11:48
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