Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Consider the following example:

public interface Bar {
}

@Entity
@Inheritance(strategy = InheritanceType.TABLE_PER_CLASS)
public DefaultBar implements Bar {

  @Id
  @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.TABLE)
  private long id;

}

@Entity
public class Foo {

  @Id
  @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.TABLE)
  private long id;

  @OneToMany(cascade = CascadeType.ALL, targetEntity = DefaultBar.class)
  @JoinColumn(name = "FOO_ID")
  private Collection<Bar> bars;

  public Collection<Bar> getBars() {
    return bars;
  }
}

That'll work all right. BUT - suppose I'll make a subclass of Foo; say FooFoo. And I want the "bars" association to point to a new implementation of Bar too. Say:

@Entity
public NewBar extends DefaultBar {

}

And now I would like to annotate FooFoo so it sets the target entity of the "bars" field to the NewBar class.

@Entity
@AssociationOverride(name="bars", ???????)
public class FooFoo extends Foo {

}

I noticed the annotation @AssociationOverride, but at first sight it doesn't allow the target entity to be overriden. Or does it ?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There seems to be no way to do this in context of JPA. Hibernate has specific meta-annotations to override a OneToMany annotation of a superclass.

In the meantime it appears the @AssociationOverride annotation only applies to classes marked with @MappedSuperclass. But then they can't be used as target entity in the OneToMany association.

Chicken and egg problem really... Or is it ?

Java does not allow the override of fields. But it does for methods. If the superclass uses property access, THEN is works. Let the subclass override the getter and there you go ! :-)

share|improve this answer

As long as you use inheritance in Bar then you don't need to do anything. If FooFoo has relationships to NewBar, they will be read back.

Otherwise you could add a new field to NewBar, or move the Bar relationship down to the subclasses.

share|improve this answer
    
But how ? There's no foreign key in the database from FooFoo to NewBar. Trickery of the JPA implementer ? – Jan Goyvaerts Oct 6 '11 at 13:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.