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I can't understand guys why following code doesn't work:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;
#define maxelms 100

class IntSet{
public :
    int n,*x;
public:
    IntSet(){
        x=new int[1+maxelms];
        for (int i=0;i<maxelms;i++){
            x[i]=0;
        }
    }

    void insert()
    {
        for (int i=0;i<=maxelms;i++)
        {
            x[i]=rand()+RAND_MAX;
        }
    }

    void Sort(){
        sort(&x[0],&x[n]);
    }

    void print()
    {
        for (int i=0;i<n;i++){
            cout<<x[i]<<"  ";
            delete[]x;
        }
    }
};
int main(){
    IntSet b;
    b.insert();
    b.Sort();
    b.print();
    return 0;
}

Please help me.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Doug T., Pratik, Wooble, Bill the Lizard Oct 6 '11 at 15:33

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Is this homework? – NPE Oct 6 '11 at 14:06
2  
Please do something about the appalling code formatting – Paul R Oct 6 '11 at 14:07
    
no this is not homework – dato datuashvili Oct 6 '11 at 14:07
2  
You need to be more specific. What doesn't work? Does it fail to compile? Does it crash? Does it not behave as expected? What have you tried? – Doug T. Oct 6 '11 at 14:08
    
@user466534 Where does sort function fin in being called in your class? – Desolator Oct 6 '11 at 14:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

1) You never set n, but you try to use it. Change the constructor to this:

IntSet(){
  x=new int[1+maxelms];
    for (int i=0;i<maxelms;i++){
  x[i]=0;
  n = 1+maxelms;
}

2) In the loop which prints values, you attempt to delete the array after you have printed just one element, then move on to the next element. Change print to:

void print()
{
    for (int i=0;i<n;i++){
        cout<<x[i]<<"  ";
    }
    delete[]x;
}

3) Don't use a dynamically allocated array if ints. Use a vector instead.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why (3)? Doesn't sort work fine on arrays as well as vectors? – e.dan Oct 6 '11 at 14:19
    
Sure, but using new and delete is a recipe for bugs, which you have just proved yourself. So why use them if you don't have to? – John Dibling Oct 6 '11 at 14:22
    
@e.dan: Because arrays are evil. – Fred Larson Oct 6 '11 at 14:23
    
@John: Fair enough, I wasn't saying I'd prefer to use arrays, but I was trying to help analyze the code as written rather than going to a broader scope of what tools to use to solve the problem, which is a much more in depth discussion. But you're right, I guess that kind of comment is in place too, just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something. – e.dan Oct 6 '11 at 14:24
1  
@e.dan: I've read the FQA, cover-to-cover. It is a horrible, biased and factually incorrect rant of a C programmer who doesn't like C++. If you don't like C++, fine. Please code in C. – John Dibling Oct 6 '11 at 14:36

You have several bugs in the code, like:

  1. Calling delete[]x inside the loop that loops over x - move it to after.
  2. Sort and print rely on class member n that is never initialized.

Try debugging and iterating, and even experimenting with Unit Tests!

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh - I missed the n bit.. – Nim Oct 6 '11 at 14:13

I'd hazard, it has something to do with this:

         for (int i=0;i<n;i++){

             cout<<x[i]<<"  ";
             delete[]x;
         }

Now - that should be enough of a hint...

share|improve this answer
IntSet(){
    //add
    n=maxelms;

//add destructor
~IntSet(){
    delete[] x;//move to here
}
share|improve this answer

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