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I'm trying to find a good, efficient way to run a query like this:

SELECT *
  FROM tableA a
 WHERE    a.manager IN (    SELECT id
                                 FROM tableB b
                           CONNECT BY PRIOR b.id = b.manager_id
                           START WITH b.id = 'managerBob')
       OR a.teamLead IN (    SELECT ID
                               FROM tableB b
                         CONNECT BY PRIOR b.ID = b.manager_id
                         START WITH b.ID = 'managerBob')
       OR a.creator IN (    SELECT id
                              FROM tableB b
                        CONNECT BY PRIOR b.id = b.manager_id
                        START WITH b.id = 'managerBob')

As you can see, I'm trying to use multiple WHERE clauses, but each clause is using the same dataset on the right-hand side of the equation. It seems to run very slowly if I use more than one clause, and I'm pretty sure that it's because Oracle is running each subquery. Is there a way to make something like this work?

SELECT *
  FROM tableA a
 WHERE    a.manager, 
          a.teamLead, 
          a.creator in (    SELECT id
                                 FROM tableB b
                           CONNECT BY PRIOR b.id = b.manager_id
                           START WITH b.id = 'managerBob')

By the way, I'm sorry if this is something I could have Googled, I'm not entirely clear on what to call this.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Subquery factoring may help:

WITH people AS
(    SELECT id
       FROM tableB b
    CONNECT BY PRIOR b.id = b.manager_id
      START WITH b.id = 'managerBob'
)
SELECT *
  FROM tableA a
 WHERE    a.manager IN (SELECT id FROM people)
       OR a.teamLead IN (SELECT id FROM people)
       OR a.creator IN (SELECT id FROM people)
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This syntax bugs me, but it is the fastest in terms of execution. Thank you for telling me what it's called though, that was the most frustrating part of trying to figure it out :) –  monitorjbl Oct 6 '11 at 14:52

You can do:

WITH bob_subordinates AS (
(    SELECT id
       FROM tableB b
 CONNECT BY PRIOR b.id = b.manager_id
 START WITH b.id = 'managerBob')
SELECT * FROM tableA a
 WHERE a.manager in  (select id from bob_subordinates)
    OR a.teamlead in (select id from bob_subordinates)
    or a.creator  in (select id from bob_subordinates)

Alternative (check the use of DISTINCT: if ids are not unique in table B then this is not equivalent):

WITH bob_subordinates AS (
(    SELECT DISTINCT id
       FROM tableB b
 CONNECT BY PRIOR b.id = b.manager_id
 START WITH b.id = 'managerBob')
SELECT DISTINCT a.*
  FROM tableA a JOIN bob_subordinates b ON b.id IN (a.manager, a.teamlead, a.creator);
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UPDATE as per comments - try

SELECT A.* FROM 
(SELECT bb.id FROM tableB bb CONNECT BY PRIOR bb.id = bb.manager_id START WITH bb.id = 'managerBob') B INNER JOIN TABLEA A ON B.ID IN (A.MANAGER, A.TEAMLEAD, A.CREATOR)
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You can simplify the where clause a bit: WHERE b.id in (a.manager, a.teamlead, a.creator) –  Josh Oct 6 '11 at 14:24
2  
I wish people would stop trying to teach people to use , instead of JOIN :( –  MatBailie Oct 6 '11 at 14:27
    
see the update above... –  Yahia Oct 6 '11 at 14:31
    
This works, and I much prefer this syntax, but Oracle doesn't process it as quickly as the WITH() solution. I'm seeing about a 50-70% increase in execution time with this syntax over WITH. I'm not sure why, it may just be that Oracle optimizes the WITH statement in some way. –  monitorjbl Oct 6 '11 at 14:50

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