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I have the following XML:

<A>
  <B>
     <C Since="2011-09-26T11:12:41.1383089Z">
       <E Name="One" AnotherDate="2011-09-26T10:54:05.7025781Z"/>
       <E Name="Two" AnotherDate="2011-09-26T11:54:05.7025781Z"/>
     </C>
  </B>
</A>

My Xpath expression looks like follows:

//A/B/C/E[@AnotherDate <= ../@Since]

This works fine with XMLSpy, also in a T-SQL 2008 query

where X.exists(xpathexpression)=1 

but not in .NET 3.5 with XmlDocument.SelectNodes().

As far as I understand the xpath documentation this query should be possible in XPATH 1.0 which .NET supports in that version.

What am I trying to achieve: I want to select all elements E that have a AnotherDate earlier or equal to their parent element C's Since attribute.

So: what am I doing wrong or what can I change to achieve something similar. Please note, that the query should also work in the given sql where clause.

share|improve this question
    
If you know that A is the root element, then don't start your query with //. It not only makes your query slower, it can also make it wrong. – svick Oct 6 '11 at 15:12
    
you're right. But thats not the real problem I'm afraid. Nonetheless thanks for the remark. – StampedeXV Oct 6 '11 at 15:15
    
@StampedeXV: Good question, +1. This is very easy to do in XPath 1.0 and at present you have selected the wrong answer. :) – Dimitre Novatchev Oct 7 '11 at 12:53
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is pretty straight-forward. Use:

  /A/B/C/E
     [not(translate(@AnotherDate, '-:TZ', '')
         >
          translate(../@Since, '-:TZ', '')
          )
      ]

XSLT-based verification:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
     <xsl:copy-of select=
     "/A/B/C/E
         [not(translate(@AnotherDate, '-:TZ', '')
             >
              translate(../@Since, '-:TZ', '')
              )
          ]
     "/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<A>
    <B>
        <C Since="2011-09-26T11:12:41.1383089Z">
            <E Name="One" AnotherDate="2011-09-26T10:54:05.7025781Z"/>
            <E Name="Two" AnotherDate="2011-09-26T11:54:05.7025781Z"/>
        </C>
    </B>
</A>

the wanted, correct result (the selected just one node) is copied to the output:

<E Name="One" AnotherDate="2011-09-26T10:54:05.7025781Z" />

Explanation: Use of the standard XPath 1.0 function translate() to delete all non-digit characters from the date-time values, so that the remaining all-digit strings can then be compared correctly as numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
I really like this answer. Somehow it is so obvious, but somehow it isn't! Having thought about string comparison vs. datetime comparison, the next step to do a number comparison seems so near. It isn't though :). – StampedeXV Oct 11 '11 at 6:35
    
@StampedeXV: You are welcome. XPath often gives us the ability to do with ease and elegance things that seem "almost impossible". A beautiful and powerful (especially 2.0, not to speak of 3.0) language. – Dimitre Novatchev Oct 11 '11 at 12:28

It seems to me this behaves according to the specification:

When neither object to be compared is a node-set and the operator is <=, <, >= or >, then the objects are compared by converting both objects to numbers and comparing the numbers according to IEEE 754.

And converting strings to numbers:

a string that consists of optional whitespace followed by an optional minus sign followed by a Number followed by whitespace is converted to the IEEE 754 number that is nearest (according to the IEEE 754 round-to-nearest rule) to the mathematical value represented by the string; any other string is converted to NaN

So, in your case, two NaNs are compared, which returns false. Because of this, no nodes are returned. In XPath 2.0, the behavior differs, which is probably why it works in the other environments.

I don't think you can select nodes like this using just XPath 1.0. So, I think you can't do it just by using single SelectNodes(). If you want to achieve this using a single XPath 1.0 query, you have to hack around its limitations. See Dimitre's answer how to do that.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer is wrong. The wanted comparison can be expressed in a single XPath 1.0 expression. – Dimitre Novatchev Oct 7 '11 at 12:54
    
@DimitreNovatchev, right. But it's not a solution I would find pretty. – svick Oct 7 '11 at 17:39
    
The question here is telling the truth vs. making wrong, absolute statements that affect developers who accept them blindly. It is good that you have corrected your answer. And your explanation of the semanics of the general comparison operators in XPath 1.0 isn't bad. FYI, writing XPath expressions isn't "hacking" and what is "pretty" is in the eys of the beholder. – Dimitre Novatchev Oct 7 '11 at 18:58
    
Writing XPath expressions isn't hacking. But I think working around its limitations using non-obvious (to me) solutions is. – svick Oct 7 '11 at 19:13
    
The function translate() is a standard XPath 1.0 function and it is intended exactly for such problems -- no hacking, just regular use as intended. – Dimitre Novatchev Oct 7 '11 at 20:07

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