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I understand dependency injection, but have not had that "ah" moment, where it clicks and I really see the light.

Why should I use DI? Also, when mocking objects like those which use the file system, what would the mock object be capable of? Does it just do dummy calls (so does not really use the file system)?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let me go a couple steps farther from hvgotcodes answer:

class Service {
   Collaborator c = new Collaborator()
}

is your original class with the hard-coded dependency.

class Service {
    Collaborator c;

    Service(Collaborator c) {
       this.c = c;
    }
}

is your newfangled class with the injected dependency.

So far, so good. Now, let's take Collaborator and extract an interface from it; call it ICollaborator. Now your newerfangled class looks like such:

class Service {
    ICollaborator c;

    Service(ICollaborator c) {
       this.c = c;
    }
}

What does this buy you? Well, you can, in your code, create this class to behave like the first example as such:

// w00t!  My code compiles and works again!  Ship it!
Service myService = new Service(new Collaborator());

Pretty cut and dry easy. The beauty comes from when you want to use a different type of Collaborator -- perhaps even a mock or fake. So long as it implements the ICollaborator interface, you're golden:

// I'm using Fake It Easy for this example.
Service myService = new Service(A.Fake<ICollaborator>());

Voila! You now have a unit-testable Service instance that doesn't drag the concrete Collaborator along for the ride (which would be breaking true "unit" testing).

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I see. I understand that this is a benefit with something like datetime. If datetime derived from an interface and I created another class from the same interface, can the methods be empty stubs? –  dotnetdev Oct 7 '11 at 15:08
    
Precisely! Now any methods with a return type should return something reasonable for that method, but void methods can be completely empty stubs. –  Jesse C. Slicer Oct 7 '11 at 15:46

The purpose of DI is to make code loosely coupled. By definition loose coupling is required for unit testing, because if many classes are tightly coupled, it's not a unit test any longer (but rather an integration test).

However, the purpose of DI is not to enable unit testing, but rather to make your code base more maintainable. One of the many positive side effects is that it also becomes eminently more testable.

When it comes to mocking the file system, it's basically a bad idea to mirror the aspects of the file system too closely, as that will lead to a Leaky Abstraction. Instead, you should consider working with streams or similar concepts.

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Dependency injection is simply the practice of not hard coding dependencies into a component. For example

class Service {
   Collaborator c = new Collaborator()
}

that pseudocode has the collaborator hard coded. It's hard to change. If you did

class Service {
    Collaborator c;

    Service(Collaborator c) {
       this.c = c;
    }
}

now you can 'inject' the desired collaborator into the Service component via the constructor. There is no hard-coded dependency.

This is good so you can swap out implementations of the collaborator easily. Your code is now 'loosely coupled' -- there are no hard dependencies on specific implementations, only on types and behaviors.

One application of this is that you can now test Service by injecting a mock collaborator in your test, so you can test all the service functionality in a way that does not depend on the collaborator.

In practice, you want Collaborator to be an interface (or whatever equivalent your language of choice supports) so that you can define the behavior, and leave the implementation up to the actual instance that you inject.

The second part of your question, about mocking a collaborator that does file operations, is correct. If you mock the file system collaborator, you can test what uses the collaborator in isolation without actually hitting the file system

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To add more to the discussion...

Most of the time when people talk about DI the main argument will be along the lines of testability but, as Mark Seeman pointed out (by the way buy his book about DI, is awsome and very enlightening, sorry about the commercial) the most important aspect of it is to make your application loosely coupled and thus more maintainable.

To provide an example with the same code shown in the other answers:

Lets say that you get a new requirement that depending on the .... I don't know .... time of year, you need to use a different collaborator, you could do something like the following:

ICollaborator collaborator;

switch(timeOfYear)  
{  
    case "Spring":  
        collaborator = new SpringCollaborator();  
        break;  
    case "Summer":  
        collaborator = new SummerCollaborator();  
        break;  
    case "Fall":  
        collaborator = new FallCollaborator();  
        break;  
    case "Winter":  
        collaborator = new WinterCollaborator();  
        break;  
}  

Service myService = new Service(collaborator);

This way you can create as many implementations as you need and your service will never need to change since it does not care about the details of the collaborator as long as it implements the ICollaborator interface.

There is quite a lot more about DI but both loosely coupling and testability are always the two benefits first pointed out.

Regards.

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