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I am writing an application that incorporates NHibernate.

The load times and everything appear to be well within reason from my initial configuration. However, I am trying to perform a stress test for more of a worse case scenario for the application. This stress test has bumped up the number of objects substantially and I am now saving 3 classes: 2400 Intersections, 9600 Zones, and 5000 Vehicles.

My problem I am running across is trying to save the items to the database for the first time. I create all the items and then attempt to save them via:

using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
{
    foreach (Vehicle veh in Program.data.Vehicles.list)
    {
        session.Save(veh);
    }
    //  Commit transactions
    tx.Commit();
}

However, I keep running across a:

System.StackOverflowException was unhandled Message: An unhandled exception of type 'System.StackOverflowException' occurred in System.Data.dll

I have tried adding a counter to call Flush every 2 iterations through the loop. The problem is that the Vehicle contains a list of Zones and the Zone contains a list of Vehicles. It just so happens that every vehicle has a list of every zone and vice versa. So calling the first session.Save is not only saving the first Vehicle, but queuing up the saving of every Zone, which in turns saves all the Vehicles.

I have the Zone list in the Vehicle set to inverse = false; therefore, it is saving all the Zones that are in the Vehicle list if they don't exist.

Is there any way to tell NHibernate to commit the changes ever so often so I don't hit the StackOverflowException? I tried adding a counter to Flush the session every 10 saves, but I hit the overflow exception before it ever reaches this. When it saves the first Vehicle, it is saving every Zone. Since every zone contains every Vehicle it is saving every vehicle. I never hit the flush before I get the overflow exception.

I'd really like to be able to just call save on the Vehicle and it cascade the save to the Zone. It will save me a lot of time from having to iterate through both the Zone list and then retouching the Zone again when I save the Vehicle.

Any ideas?

EDIT It appears to be choking on the tx.Commit(). Any help getting this resolved would be greatly appreciated.

EDIT Posting mappings as asked. I cut out some of the excess properties and stuff being mapped and just kept the 3 lists for the main classes.

Vehicles and Intersections are derived from Device and is mapped as such:

<hibernate-mapping xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2">
  <class xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" name="EMTRAC.Devices.Device, EMTRAC_v3, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null" table="`Device`">
    <joined-subclass name="EMTRAC.Intersections.Intersection, EMTRAC_v3, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null">
      <key>
        <column name="Device_id" />
      </key>      
      <component name="Zones" access="property">
        <bag name="_list" cascade="all-delete-orphan" access="field" fetch="join" inverse="false">
          <key>
            <column name="Zone_PK" />
          </key> 
          <many-to-many class="EMTRAC.Zones.Zone, EMTRAC_v3, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null"/>
        </bag>
      </component>
      <property name="ID" type="System.Int32, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">
        <column name="ID" />
      </property>
    </joined-subclass>
    <joined-subclass name="EMTRAC.Vehicles.Vehicle, EMTRAC_v3, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null">
      <key>
        <column name="Device_id" />
      </key>      
      <component name="Zones" access="property">
        <bag name="_list" cascade="save-update" access="field" table="VehicleZones" inverse="true">
          <key>
            <column name="veh_id" not-null="true"/>
          </key>
          <many-to-many class="EMTRAC.Zones.Zone, EMTRAC_v3, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null"/>
        </bag>
      </component>
      <property name="ID" type="System.Int32, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">
        <column name="ID" />
      </property>     
    </joined-subclass>
  </class>
</hibernate-mapping>

And the Zone mapping is as follows:

<hibernate-mapping xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2">
  <class xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" name="EMTRAC.Zones.Zone, EMTRAC_v3, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null" table="`Zone`">
    <id name="ID" type="System.Int32, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">
      <column name="PK"/>
      <generator class="identity" />
    </id>
    <version name="LastModifiedOn" column="LastModifiedOn" type="timestamp" access="field.pascalcase-underscore" />
    <property name="ID" type="System.Int32, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">
      <column name="ID" />
    </property>    
    <component name="Vehicles" access="property">
      <bag name="_list" cascade="save-update" access="field" table="VehicleZones">
        <key>
          <column name="veh_id" not-null="true"/>
        </key>
        <many-to-many class="EMTRAC.Vehicles.Vehicle, EMTRAC_v3, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null"/>
      </bag>
    </component>
  </class>
</hibernate-mapping>

I set the inverse to true on the Vehicle side so they are hopefully all mapped via the Vehicle, but not 100% sure if that is mapped correctly or not.

share|improve this question
    
Every vehicle has a list of every zone and vice versa? What is the point of that relationship? It's going to be a link table with (#vehicles * #zones) rows. –  dotjoe Oct 6 '11 at 18:55
    
This was designed this way as a stress test. Not every vehicle in production will necessarily have every zone etc. But the links to the vehicle and zone will always be bi-directional. I just used this as a reference for stressing in a worse case scenario. I want to see if NHibernate can handle a large collection of objects. Also saving this many items at once will rarely if ever be done this manner, but I have to have it usable if the need arises or there is no point using NHibernate. –  Nathan Raley Oct 6 '11 at 19:31
1  
oh I see, surely only one side of the many-to-many should cascade? Could you post the mappings? –  dotjoe Oct 6 '11 at 20:02
    
Posted as you requested. I'm still not sure I have that mapped 100% correctly or not so any recommendations would be appreciated. The Intersections contain a List of Zones, each Zone must belong to only 1 Intersection and each Intersection can contain multiple Zones. I explained the relationship between the Vehicles and the Zones. As you can see its a pretty complex relation that is making finding a correct saving procedure rather difficult. –  Nathan Raley Oct 6 '11 at 20:36
    
Since you're saving Vehicles maybe try setting the Zone's many-to-many bag to cascade="none" and make the Vehicles many-to-many inverse="false". Note that those are the defaults for those attributes, so you could just remove them too. –  dotjoe Oct 6 '11 at 20:55

2 Answers 2

It is choking on tx.Commit() as this is the place where real database queries are run.

If you have proper two-way many-to-many relationship between zones and vehicles and you have cascades on both sides, NHibernate should take care of it and save everything correctly. So I'm assuming your problem is caused by big numbers of entities and NHibernate trying to draw and keep whole object graph. Flushing wouldn't help here as whole save operation is performed by cascades at first object's save.

I'm afraid you either have to split your save operation to inserting all Zones with empty vehicles collections first and then inserting all vehicles with zones assigned, or maybe consider using NHibernate's StatelessSession for this whole operation. Stateless session don't keep objects in any cache nor perform cascades - it is generally more suitable for batch updates like yours.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't think you could save collections thru a stateless session? –  Nathan Raley Oct 6 '11 at 19:01
1  
Ah, you're right. It can work with bi-directional one-to-many, but don't know is it possible with many-to-many. So I can see no other way than manual iterating. –  NOtherDev Oct 6 '11 at 19:21
1  
If you had an entity that represented the relationship in a many to many I would assume you could use it. It's kind of kludgy but it might work. –  Cole W Oct 6 '11 at 19:56
    
Yea, I'd try it but I have always gotten a no persistor exists for xx when trying to use sessionless. I'd do a foreach(Vehicle veh in Program.data.Vehicles.list) { session.Update(veh); session.Insert(veh.Zone); } if I was using that right? –  Nathan Raley Oct 6 '11 at 20:00

You could try adding your zones incrementally to your vehicle and saving them. For example you would do something like this:

Vehicle newVehicle = new Vehicle();

foreach(Zone newZone in myNewZonesList)
{
    using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
    {
        newVehicle.AddZone(newZone);
        session.SaveOrUpdate(newVehicle);
        tx.Commit();
    }
}

How often is this scenario really going to happen though? Is this common to create a new vehicle and add 9600 zones to it right off jump street? At some point you have to think about YAGNI in my opinion.

share|improve this answer
    
Creating a vehicle and adding all the zones to it could be an approach that would occur relatively often. The same goes for creating a zone and adding it to all of the Vehicles. If not all zones then a good majority of them. But then you are only doing the iteration once and not for every single vehicle for every single zone, which is what I have to do to set up the stress test and is what I am having issues with now. –  Nathan Raley Oct 7 '11 at 15:37
    
Using the transaction per save approach seems to be helping thus far. I'll know later if it completes successfully. I did the math and it turns out it would be 48 million rows in the table that is mapping the 2 lists. That was a bit overkill for a single transaction and would explain why it was dieing. That being said, I'll have to wait for all 48 million records to insert in this case to know if the save completes this time. In the mean time, +1 for the advice so far. –  Nathan Raley Oct 7 '11 at 15:59
    
Any idea as to why each call to tx.Commit() is taking progressively longer and longer? –  Nathan Raley Oct 7 '11 at 20:25
    
Is the overhead in creating a separate transaction for each vehicle save causing this? –  Nathan Raley Oct 7 '11 at 20:31
    
You could try batching the addition of the zones. So add like 10 zones then commit them in a transaction. It could be slowing down because your session object becomes bloated. You could try creating a new session on each transaction. –  Cole W Oct 8 '11 at 14:39

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