Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a simple controller test, containing a.o. the following code:

context "POST :create" do
  before (:each) do
    post :create, :user_id => @user.id,
         :account => { .. some data ... }
  end
  it { response.status.should == 201 }
  it { response.location.should be_present }
end

Now I thought of a very simple way to speed up this test, and to use a before(:all) instead of a before(:each). In that case the post would only be done once.

So i wrote:

context "POST :create" do
  before (:all) do
    post :create, :user_id => @user.id,
         :account => { .. some data ... }
  end
  it { response.status.should == 201 }
  it { response.location.should be_present }
end

But then I get the following errors:

 RuntimeError:
   @routes is nil: make sure you set it in your test's setup method.

Is this by design? Is there a way to circumvent it?

share|improve this question
1  
Have you found a solution to this? I've run into the same issue. –  ktusznio Feb 22 '12 at 18:57

3 Answers 3

I asked this question on the rspec mailing list, and got the following reply from @dchelimsky himself:

Yes. rspec-rails wraps the rails' testing framework which doesn't have a before(:all) concept in it, so all the data is reset before each example. Even if we wanted to support this in rspec-rails (which I don't) it would require changes to rails first.

So doing controller calls is not possible in a before(:all), it can only be used to setup your DB or instance variables.

share|improve this answer

If you want to go the dirty global variable way and benefit from the speeding increase, you can use this but caution. This messy logic does the job but defeats the purpose of driving with crystal clear readable tests. Refactoring in a helper with yield is more than recommended.

describe PagesController do
  describe "GET 'index'" do
    before(:each) do
      GLOBAL ||= {}
      @response = GLOBAL[Time.now.to_f] || begin
        get :index
        response
      end
    end
    it { @response.should redirect_to(root_path) }
    it { @response.status.should == 301 }
    it { @response.location.should be_present }
  end
end

The refactor you can put into a file of your choice in spec/support goes as follow

RSPEC_GLOBAL = {}

def remember_through_each_test_of_current_scope(variable_name)
  self.instance_variable_set("@#{variable_name}", RSPEC_GLOBAL[variable_name] || begin
    yield
  end)
  RSPEC_GLOBAL[variable_name] ||= self.instance_variable_get("@#{variable_name}")
end

Thus, the code in test file becomes :

describe PagesController do
  describe "GET 'index'" do
    before(:each) do
      remember_through_each_test_of_current_scope('memoized_response') do
        get :index
        response
      end
    end
    it { @memoized_response.should redirect_to(root_path) }
    it { @memoized_response.status.should == 301 }
    it { @memoized_response.location.should be_present }
  end
end

Hope it helps, and once again, use with caution

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure if this is a good idea, but setting a class variable with ||= in the before(:each) block seems to work:

describe PagesController do
  describe "GET 'index'" do
    before(:each) do
      @@response ||= begin
        get :index
        response
      end
    end
    it { @@response.should redirect_to(root_path) }
    it { @@response.status.should == 301 }
    it { @@response.location.should be_present }
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Did your try this? When I tested this the POST did not even work, because you are not yet in any controller context. –  nathanvda Feb 27 '12 at 7:01
    
Oops, that was meant to say haven't tried this. Updated answer with a different technique. –  Zubin Feb 28 '12 at 9:07
    
Now you do a before(:each) again, which is exactly what I wanted to avoid, and then there much prettier/readable ways to write it. If you do the before :each you can just write get :index and use response. –  nathanvda Apr 7 '12 at 7:27
    
@nathanvda note the use of a class variable and ||= - this should only execute the code the first time. –  Zubin Apr 15 '12 at 22:23
    
why was this not accepted as an answer? Can someone comment on if this is a good practice or not. It does seem to work –  Faraaz Khan Apr 4 '13 at 17:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.