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public MyClass(Integer userId, Integer otherId) {
  if(!userId.equals(otherId)){
    this.userId = userId;
    this.otherId = otherId;
  }
}

Thats as far as I got, I want to ensure an instance if never created with matching id's ?

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4 Answers 4

If you can't allow the two values to be equal then pretty much your only option it to raise an exception in that case.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I created another method and made the constructor private, it returns null if matching ids

private MyClass(Integer userId, Integer otherId) {
 {
    this.userId = userId;
    this.otherId = otherId;
  }
}
public static  MyClass getInstance(Integer userId, Integer otherId) 
  if(!userId.equals(otherId)){
    return new MyClass(userId,otherId);
  }

  return null;
}
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I might be completely missing the point of your design, but if you want to create instances of an object with unique ID's that never clash consider using a UUID. Your instances should never have to do a 'circle-jerk' of ID comparisons to make sure none of them are violating the uniqueness constraints.

Documentation on UUID.

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+1 "'circle-jerk' of ID comparisons" - that has to be the first time those words have shared a sentence! –  millhouse Oct 20 '11 at 6:12

I use another approach, I keep a registry of newly created instances (in an HashSet) and allow instatiation of Objects via a static factory.

class User {
  private int _id;

  private static HashSet _instanced = new HashSet();

  public static User getInstance(Integer id) {
    if (_instanced.contains(id)) {
      return null;
    }
    return new User(id);
  }

  private User(Integer id) {
    _id = id.toInt();
  }

  // Getter/Setter for ID
}

Since the constructor is private, none will instantiate another User with the same id.

in your methods you could then write

User x = User.getInstance(1);

Of course this will add one more level to your solution. Still I prefer this kind of approach.

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Looks like a big memory leak waiting to happen to me - and a source of thread problems. I would urge the OP not to do this unless they definitely need to. –  Jon Skeet Oct 6 '11 at 16:15
    
I agree, you have to take care of cleaning up when items are no more needed by adding a Dispose() in the User class (java don't has destructors, so you have to manage this things yourself). Used a similar thing in web apps, not much datas around. If numbers gets high, I prefer to have the check in db PKs and managing duplicate insert exceptions. From this point of view Nim answer is a lot better, as usual, it depends. PS: for shortage I've omitted syncro stuffs :) –  BigMike Oct 6 '11 at 16:20

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