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Why is the following algorithm not halting for me? (str is the string I am searching in, findStr is the string I am trying to find)

    String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
    String findStr = "hello";
    int lastIndex = 0;
    int count =0;

    while(lastIndex != -1){

           lastIndex = str.indexOf(findStr,lastIndex);

           if( lastIndex != -1){
                 count ++;
          }
        lastIndex+=findStr.length();
    }
    System.out.println(count);

EDIT- updated, still not working

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14 Answers 14

up vote 27 down vote accepted

The last line in was creating a problem... last endex would never be left at -1 so there would be an infinite loop... you can fix it by moving the code in the if block.

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";
int lastIndex = 0;
int count =0;

while(lastIndex != -1){

       lastIndex = str.indexOf(findStr,lastIndex);

       if( lastIndex != -1){
             count ++;
             lastIndex+=findStr.length();
      }
}
System.out.println(count);
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19  
This reply is the exact copy of the post I made an hour before ;) –  Olivier Apr 20 '09 at 14:16
    
Note that this might or might not return the result expected. With substring "aa" and string to search "aaa" the number of occurences expected may be one (returned by this code), but may be two as well (in this case you'll need "lastIndex++" instead of "lastIndex += findStr.length()") depending on what you are looking for. –  Stanislav Kniazev Apr 23 '09 at 12:52
    
@olivier didnt see that... :( @stan thats absolutely correct... i was just fixing the code in the problem... guess it depends on what bobcom means by number of occurrences in the string... –  codebreach Apr 24 '09 at 20:52
    
do{ ... } while(lastIndex != -1) would be a better fit, esp. when processing multiple lines. –  yanchenko Jul 11 '09 at 15:03

do you really have to handle the matching yourself ? especially if all you need is the number of occurences, regular expressions are tidier :

    String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile("hello");
    Matcher m = p.matcher(str);
    int count = 0;
    while (m.find()){
    	count +=1;
    }
    System.out.println(count);
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Good Answer. Nice use of Pattern/Matcher.. :) –  Chintan Rathod Jul 8 '13 at 9:49
    
This does NOT find special characters, it will find 0 count for strings below: String str = "hel+loslkhel+lodjladfjhel+lo"; Pattern p = Pattern.compile("hel+lo"); –  Ben Feb 2 at 4:09
2  
yes it will if you express your regex correctly. try with Pattern.compile("hel\\+lo"); the + sign has a special meaning in a regex and needs to be escaped. –  Jean Feb 2 at 9:42

How about using StringUtils.countMatches from Apache Commons Lang?

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";

System.out.println(StringUtils.countMatches(str, findStr));

That outputs:

3
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Should be accepted as solution... –  ArcanisCz Apr 10 at 0:12
    
No matter how right this suggestion is , it cannot be accepted as the solution as it is not answering OP's question –  kommradHomer Jul 12 at 11:36
    
Is this deprecated or something .. my IDE is not recognising –  Vamsi Pavan Mahesh Jul 18 at 16:30

You "lastIndex += findStr.length();" was placed outside the brackets, causing an infinite loop (when no occurence was found, lastIndex was always to findStr.length().

Here is the fixed version :

        String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
    	String findStr = "hello";
    	int lastIndex = 0;
    	int count = 0;

    	while (lastIndex != -1) {

    		lastIndex = str.indexOf(findStr, lastIndex);

    		if (lastIndex != -1) {
    			count++;
    			lastIndex += findStr.length();
    		}
    	}
    	System.out.println(count);
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A shorter version. ;)

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";
System.out.println(str.split(findStr, -1).length-1);
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4  
return haystack.split(Pattern.quote(needle), -1).length - 1; if for instance needle=":)" –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Dec 16 '12 at 16:01
    
You can even remove second argument of split() for a shorter one-liner –  Laurent Dec 28 '12 at 11:46
    
@lOranger Without the ,-1 it will drop trailing matches. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 28 '12 at 12:02
1  
Ouch, thanks, good to know! This will teach me to read the small lines in the javadoc... –  Laurent Dec 28 '12 at 12:05
2  
Nice! But it includes only non-overlapping matches, no? E.g. matching "aa" in "aaa" will return 1, not 2? Of course including overlapping or non-overlapping matches are both valid and dependent on user requirements (perhaps a flag to indicate count overlaps, yes/no)? –  Cornel Masson Apr 26 '13 at 9:24
    String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
    String findStr = "hello";
    int lastIndex = 0;
    int count = 0;

    while ((lastIndex = str.indexOf(findStr, lastIndex)) != -1) {
        count++;
        lastIndex += findStr.length() - 1;
    }

    System.out.println(count);

at the end of the loop count is 3; hope it helps

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1  
Best example here. –  marcolopes May 30 '11 at 18:44

Increment lastIndex whenever you look for next occurence. Otherwise it's always finding the first substring (at position 0).

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public int indexOf(int ch, int fromIndex)

Returns the index within this string of the first occurrence of the specified character, starting the search at the specified index.

So your lastindex value is always 0 and it always finds hello in the string.

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try adding lastIndex+=findStr.length() to the end of your loop, otherwise you will end up in an endless loop because once you found the substring, you are trying to find it again and again from the same last position.

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I did this and the function still does not work. –  bobcom Apr 20 '09 at 10:59

Try this one. It replaces all the matches with a -.

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String findStr = "hello";
int numberOfMatches = 0;
while (str.contains(findStr)){
    str = str.replaceFirst(findStr, "-");
    numberOfMatches++;
}

And if you don't want to destroy your str you can create a new string with the same content:

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello";
String strDestroy = str;
String findStr = "hello";
int numberOfMatches = 0;
while (strDestroy.contains(findStr)){
    strDestroy = strDestroy.replaceFirst(findStr, "-");
    numberOfMatches++;
}

After executing this block these will be your values:

str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhello"
strDestroy = "-slk-djladfj-"
findStr = "hello"
numberOfMatches = 3
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Here is the advanced version for counting how many times the token occurred in a user entered string:

public class StringIndexOf {

/**
 * @param args
 */
public static void main(String[] args) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);

    System.out.println("Enter a sentence please: \n");
    String string = scanner.nextLine();

    int atIndex = 0;
    int count = 0;

    while (atIndex != -1)
    {
        atIndex = string.indexOf("hello", atIndex);

        if(atIndex != -1)
        {
            count++;
            atIndex += 5;
        }
    }

    System.out.println(count);
}

}

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This below method show how many time substring repeat on ur whole string. Hope use full to you:-

    String search_pattern="aaa";
    String whole_pattern=""aaaaaababaaaaaa;
    int j = search_pattern.length();
    for (int i = 0; i < whole_pattern.length() - j + 1; i++) {

        String str1 = whole_pattern.substring(i, j + i);

        System.out.println("sub string loop " + i + " => " + str1);

        if (str1.equals(search_pattern)) {
            Constants.k++;
        }

    }
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here is the other solution without using regexp/patterns/matchers or even not using StringUtils.

String str = "helloslkhellodjladfjhelloarunkumarhelloasdhelloaruhelloasrhello";
        String findStr = "hello";
        int count =0;
        int findStrLength = findStr.length();
        for(int i=0;i<str.length();i++){
            if(findStr.startsWith(Character.toString(str.charAt(i)))){
                if(str.substring(i).length() >= findStrLength){
                    if(str.substring(i, i+findStrLength).equals(findStr)){
                        count++;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        System.out.println(count);
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The answer given as correct is no good for counting things like line returns and is far too verbose. Later answers are better but all can be achieved simply with

str.split(findStr).length

It does not drop trailing matches using the example in the question.

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This has been covered in another answer already; and that answer did it better, too. –  michaelb958 Jul 3 '13 at 13:52
    
This should be a comment on the answer in question, not another answer. –  james.garriss Jan 24 at 19:05

protected by Gilbert Le Blanc Jul 3 '13 at 14:08

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