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Is there an INotifyPropertyChanged-like interface where the event args contains the old value of the property being changed, or do I have to extend that interface to create one?

For example:

    public String ProcessDescription
    {
        get { return _ProcessDescription; }
        set
        {
            if( value != ProcessDescription )
            {
                String oldValue = _ProcessDescription;
                _ProcessDescription = value;
                InvokePropertyChanged("ProcessDescription", oldvalue);
            }
        }
    }

    InvokePropertyChanged(String PropertyName, OldValue)
    {
         this.PropertyChanged( new ExtendedPropertyChangedEventArgs(PropertyName, OldValue) );
    }

I would also settle for a PropertyChanging-like event which provides this information, whether or not it supports e.Cancel.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

As indicated by the answers, I had to implement my own solution. For the benefit of others, I've presented it here:

The Extended PropertyChanged Event

This event has been specially designed to be backwards compatible with old propertyChanged events. It can be used interchangeably with the simple PropertyChangedEventArgs by callers. Of course, in such cases, it is the responsibility of the event handler to check if the passed PropertyChangedEventArgs can be downcast to a PropertyChangedExtendedEventArgs, if they want to use it. No downcasting is necessary if all they're interested in is the PropertyName property.

public class PropertyChangedExtendedEventArgs<T> : PropertyChangedEventArgs
{
    public virtual T OldValue { get; private set; }
    public virtual T NewValue { get; private set; }

    public PropertyChangedExtendedEventArgs(string propertyName, T oldValue, T newValue)
        : base(propertyName)
    {
        OldValue = oldValue;
        NewValue = newValue;
    }
}

The Extended PropertyChanged Interface

If, the programmer wanted to create an event that forces the notifying properties to include an old value and a new value, they need only implement the following interface:

// Summary: Notifies clients that a property value is changing, but includes extended event infomation
/* The following NotifyPropertyChanged Interface is employed when you wish to enforce the inclusion of old and
 * new values. (Users must provide PropertyChangedExtendedEventArgs, PropertyChangedEventArgs are disallowed.) */
public interface INotifyPropertyChangedExtended<T>
{
    event PropertyChangedExtendedEventHandler<T> PropertyChanged;
}

public delegate void PropertyChangedExtendedEventHandler<T>(object sender, PropertyChangedExtendedEventArgs<T> e);

Example 1

The user can now specify a more advanced NotifyPropertyChanged method that allows property setters to pass in their old value:

public String testString
{
    get { return testString; }
    set
    {
        String temp = testString;
        testValue2 = value;
        NotifyPropertyChanged("TestString", temp, value);
    }
}

Where your new NotifyPropertyChanged method looks like this:

protected void NotifyPropertyChanged<T>(string propertyName, T oldvalue, T newvalue)
{
    OnPropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedExtendedEventArgs<T>(propertyName, oldvalue, newvalue));
}

And OnPropertyChanged is the same as always:

public virtual void OnPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
    if (handler != null)
        handler(sender, e);
}

Example 2

Or if you prefer to use lambda expressions and do away with hard-coded property name strings entirely, you can use the following:

public String TestString
{
    get { return testString; }
    private set { SetNotifyingProperty(() => TestString, ref testString, value); }
}

Which is supported by the following magic:

protected void SetNotifyingProperty<T>(Expression<Func<T>> expression, ref T field, T value)
{
    if (field == null || !field.Equals(value))
    {
        T oldValue = field;
        field = value;
        OnPropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedExtendedEventArgs<T>(GetPropertyName(expression), oldValue, value));
    }
}
protected string GetPropertyName<T>(Expression<Func<T>> expression)
{
    MemberExpression memberExpression = (MemberExpression)expression.Body;
    return memberExpression.Member.Name;
}

Performance

If performance is a concern, see this question: Implementing NotifyPropertyChanged without magic strings.

In summary, the overhead is minimal. Adding the old value and switching to the extended event is about a 15% slowdown, still allowing for on the order of one million property notifications per second, and switching to lambda expressions is a 5 times slowdown allowing for approximately one hundred thousand property notifications per second. These figures are far from being able to form a bottleneck in any UI-driven application.

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My microbench marks proved to generate similar results, however depending on how much garbage each notification is generating, I found that excessively calling INPC with expressions put extra pressure on the GC and ended up causing a lot more Gen1 collections. All though the design was not great (and plenty of other things could be improved), changing back to strings gave us a visible performance improvement in one specific WPF application. –  Lee Campbell May 20 '13 at 9:01

Sounds like you want to use the INotifyPropertyChanging in conjunction with INotifyPropertyChanged. Msdn Documentation http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.componentmodel.inotifypropertychanging.aspx

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Neither of the event args for those two events allow the handler to determine what the value is changing from or two. Furthermore, the handling class can't be expected to 1) store a list of all the properties that fire a changing event, 2) Use reflection to get the value of all of those properties when the events are fired, so that they can 3) Compare a stored value of the property that was changed before and after the changing and changed event were fired. –  Alain Oct 6 '11 at 18:17
    
1) Why would an object who is listening for INotifyPropertyChanging not be in charge of why it is listening for the event? From an abstract point of view I think it would be unwise for any programmer to assume why someone is listening for an event (beyond knowing the event happened and why). If you plan on reusing your INotifyPropertiesChangedAndChangingWithValues then extend. If it's being used once, a new interface seems like additional work for little if any advantages. –  Erik Philips Oct 6 '11 at 18:37
    
Because 1) it takes the handler order N time to do it and the event notifier order 1 time. 2) The event notifier is the information expert. 3) Having the handler track all the properties in the object who's property changed event it is monitoring is scope creep and bad design. –  Alain Oct 6 '11 at 18:53

If you only want to old value you can invoke the event before changing the property's value. But that would be a departure of how this event is normally used, so I would create a dedicated interface and args for it.

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Property Change Notifications require that the property be assigned its new value before it's called. See the .Net Framework documentation: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms743695.aspx. All I want is to include additional information. –  Alain Oct 6 '11 at 17:07
    
You're right, I was just editing. –  Gert Arnold Oct 6 '11 at 17:09

Nope, you have to create your own from scratch.

I used to do the same in my research project, Granite, but I came to the conlcusion that it wasn't worth the cost. Too many properties I work with are calculated, and having to run them twice just to raise an event was too costly.

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@Jonathan_Allen: I did so, thanks. –  Alain Oct 12 '11 at 15:54

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