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I noticed something odd while doing profiling our code base. It seemed that sorting with a typed comparator (e.g. Comparator<MyClass>) always first called a method Comparator<MyClass>.compare(Object,Object) which then called the method Comparator<MyClass>.compare(MyClass,MyClass). Furthermore, the vast majority of the time was spent in the Comparator<MyClass>.compare(Object,Object). To explore further, I made a little test program:

public class Sandbox {
    public static void main(String argv[]) {
        for(int j=0; j<100; j++) {
            int n = 10000;
            SortMe[] sortMes = new SortMe[n];
            for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
                sortMes[i] = new SortMe(Math.random());
            }
            Arrays.sort(sortMes, new SortMeComp());
            System.out.println(Arrays.toString(sortMes));
        }
        for(int j=0; j<100; j++) {
            int n = 10000;
            SortMe[] sortMes = new SortMe[n];
            for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
                sortMes[i] = new SortMe(Math.random());
            }
            Arrays.sort(sortMes, new SortMeCompTypeless());
            System.out.println(Arrays.toString(sortMes));
        }
    }
}

The typed Comparator:

public class SortMeComp implements Comparator<SortMe>{
    public int compare(SortMe one, SortMe two) {
        if(one.getValue()>two.getValue()) {
            return -1;
        } else if (one.getValue()<two.getValue()) {
            return 1;
        } else {
            return 0;
        }
    }
}

The untyped Comparator I made for comparison:

public class SortMeCompTypeless implements Comparator{
    public int compare(Object oneObj, Object twoObj) {
        SortMe one = (SortMe) oneObj;
        SortMe two = (SortMe) twoObj;
        if(one.getValue()>two.getValue()) {
            return -1;
        } else if (one.getValue()<two.getValue()) {
            return 1;
        } else {
            return 0;
        }
    }
}

Here are the results (from YourKit profiler; let me know if you'd rather have a screenshot):

+----------------------------------------------------+-----------------+-----------------+--------------------+
|                        Name                        |    Time (ms)    |  Own Time (ms)  |  Invocation Count  |
+----------------------------------------------------+-----------------+-----------------+--------------------+
|  +---java.util.Arrays.sort(Object[], Comparator)   |  23,604  100 %  |          8,096  |               200  |
|    |                                               |                 |                 |                    |
|    +---SortMeComp.compare(Object, Object)          |  11,395   48 %  |          7,430  |        12,352,936  |
|    | |                                             |                 |                 |                    |
|    | +---SortMeComp.compare(SortMe, SortMe)        |   3,965   17 %  |          3,965  |        12,352,936  |
|    |                                               |                 |                 |                    |
|    +---SortMeCompTypeless.compare(Object, Object)  |   4,113   17 %  |          4,113  |        12,354,388  |
+----------------------------------------------------+-----------------+-----------------+--------------------+

I ran the profile without filtering, and you see the recursive calls to mergeSort (which just make it hard to read), but nothing of interest.

So what's going on here? Where is that method SortMeComp.compare(Object,Object) coming from? We figured it was something that Java creates internally for dealing with generics, but what could be taking so long? I would think the jvm would just treat a generic method like an "untyped"/Object method. As you can see, a simple cast is far quicker. Besides which, I would think this is exactly the kind of thing that would be JITed away even if the jvm needed to do upfront type stuff. What's going on here?

By the way:

$ java -version
java version "1.6.0_26"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_26-b03)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.1-b02, mixed mode)

Edit:

In response to savinos answer, I tried simulating the extra method call with an 'untyped' Comparator that simply cast to a typed compare:

public class SortMeCompMethodCalls implements Comparator{
    public int compare(Object oneObj, Object twoObj) {
        return compare((SortMe)oneObj, (SortMe)twoObj);
    }
    public int compare(SortMe one, SortMe two) {
        if(one.getValue()>two.getValue()) {
            return -1;
        } else if (one.getValue()<two.getValue()) {
            return 1;
        } else {
            return 0;
        }
    }
}

Here are the results:

+---------------------------------------------------------+-----------------+-----------------+--------------------+
|                          Name                           |    Time (ms)    |  Own Time (ms)  |  Invocation Count  |
+---------------------------------------------------------+-----------------+-----------------+--------------------+
|  +---java.util.Arrays.sort(Object[], Comparator)        |  31,044  100 %  |          8,061  |               200  |
|    |                                                    |                 |                 |                    |
|    +---SortMeComp.compare(Object, Object)               |  11,554   37 %  |          7,617  |        12,354,392  |
|    | |                                                  |                 |                 |                    |
|    | +---SortMeComp.compare(SortMe, SortMe)             |   3,936   13 %  |          3,936  |        12,354,392  |
|    |                                                    |                 |                 |                    |
|    +---SortMeCompMethodCalls.compare(Object, Object)    |  11,427   37 %  |          7,613  |        12,352,146  |
|      |                                                  |                 |                 |                    |
|      +---SortMeCompMethodCalls.compare(SortMe, SortMe)  |   3,814   12 %  |          3,814  |        12,352,146  |
+---------------------------------------------------------+-----------------+-----------------+--------------------+

So it looks like savinos is right! The extra time is only the extra method call (plus a little for the cast). That seems crazy to me; you'd think that'd be JITed away? Ah well.

I removed edit 2 and added it as an answer as it should've been originally.

share|improve this question
    
hmm i'm not familiar with yourkit but somehow the output seems to be messed up. If the toplevel is at 100%, it means the children have to be included in the parent's times. However, the times don't really add up. Could it be that the second one just jit'ed the code in a way so that those 11sec's for the 2nd sort are counted in sort() instead of compare? –  b.buchhold Oct 6 '11 at 17:28
    
@b.buchhold: Much of the sort time is going to be spent in the mergeSort (doing actual array manipulation, the recursive calls, etc). If I turned filtering, you would see all this (and it would sum to 100%) but it's practically unreadable (especially because of the recursion). By default, yourkit tries to condense calls into java library methods. –  Bryan Head Oct 6 '11 at 17:57
    
what are you using to calculate the results? benchmark? which program? –  DarthVader Oct 6 '11 at 18:28
1  
@user177883 as far as I can tell measurements are done with YourKit profiler –  gnat Oct 6 '11 at 18:52
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4 Answers

I may be wrong, but I would say that the delta between the "Object" comparator and the typed comparator (which is called by the generic one) is simply due to the extra function call.

Consider that you are doing 12,352,936 invocations, which means roughly 5.7*10^-7 seconds per function call, which is not unreasonable.

share|improve this answer
1  
See my edit. You're totally right. Pretty crazy that an extra method call would make such a big difference. Thanks! –  Bryan Head Oct 6 '11 at 18:11
1  
the difference is soooo tiny :) but it adds up :P –  Savino Sguera Oct 6 '11 at 19:18
    
Alas, the difference was just the tracing, see my Edit 2. –  Bryan Head Oct 7 '11 at 17:16
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A little off topic, but you must want it to be fast...

You'll reduce the inner compare() time by around 50%, with random data, if you change it to something like:

public int compare(SortMe one, SortMe two) {
    return one.getValue() - two.getValue();
}

However, this is only valid if the magnitude of the range of inputs is smaller than 2^31. If larger, the difference overflows.

share|improve this answer
    
Very good but it should actually be the other way around. Essentially compare() == one-two. –  EJP May 17 '13 at 7:51
    
In addition to @EJP: Your solution is still wrong because of arithmetic overflow. See the implementation of Integer#compare(int, int). Now you know why they implement it this way. :P –  xehpuk May 17 '13 at 11:45
    
@EJP - fixed, thanks. –  Ed Staub May 17 '13 at 20:41
    
@xehpuk - right - that would be a nasty problem! I left up the answer, with a big warning - there are probably applications where it makes sense. –  Ed Staub May 17 '13 at 20:49
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Where is that method SortMeComp.compare(Object,Object) coming from? We figured it was something that Java creates internally for dealing with generics,

That is correct. It is inserted by the compiler as a thunk to the method you wrote SortMeComp.compare(SortMe one, SortMe two).

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I started wondering if this whole thing was an artifact of tracing (I was use trace profiling, not sampling). I have seen tracing cause distortions in the past in method call heavy areas. So I did a straight timing test:

public class Sandbox {
    public static void main(String argv[]) {
        long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        sortTest(10000, 10000, new SortMeComp());
        System.err.println("\n"+(System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime));
        startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        sortTest(10000, 10000, new SortMeCompTypeless());
        System.err.println("\n"+(System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime));
    }

    public static void sortTest(int n, int l, Comparator<SortMe> c) {
        for(int i=0; i<n; i++) {
            SortMe[] sortMes = new SortMe[l];
            for(int j=0; j<l; j++) {
                sortMes[j] = new SortMe(Math.random());
            }
            System.out.print(sortMes[(int)(Math.random()*l)].getValue());
            Arrays.sort(sortMes, c);
        }
    }
}

Here are the results:

[bunch of doubles...]
sortTest(10000, 10000, new SortMeComp()): 18168
[bunch of doubles...]
sortTest(10000, 10000, new SortMeCompTypeless()): 19366

As you can see, the typed one in fact performs faster, which is to be expected as it is not doing a cast. Thus, it appears that the difference I was seeing was entirely due to tracing. My faith in Hotswap has been restored!

By the way, I put in the printlns just to make sure the jvm wouldn't optimize away the loop in any way.

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