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Is this thread safe? Specifically, is it possible for the GetMyObject() method to return null? I understand it is possible for two threads to get a different instance of MyObject but I don't care about that. I just want to make sure it is safe to assume GetMyObject() will never return null.

   class Foo {
        private static MyObject obj;
        public static MyObject GetMyObject() {
            MyObject o = obj;
            if(o == null) {
                o = new MyObject();
                obj = o;
            }
            return o;
        }
        public static void ClearMyObject() {
            obj = null;
        }
    }

    class MyObject {}
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

GetMyObject() can never return null. The easy way to see this is to note that 'o' is a local variable so no-one else can affect it.

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This answer is dangerous. It's correct, but it completely neglects thread-safety issues. – jason Oct 6 '11 at 18:42
    
It depends on the desired semantics. This will not leak memory so it is safe from that perspective. It will allow more than one object to be created so it isn't safe from that perspective. I find this pattern useful for cases where a singleton is desired for performance but the code will work if more than one instance of the object is created. This code avoids any synchronization overhead. – Laurion Burchall Oct 6 '11 at 18:48
    
Sorry, performance is beyond irrelevant here. This will never be a bottleneck in any realistic application. – jason Oct 6 '11 at 18:50

Is this thread safe?

No.

is it possible for the GetMyObject() method to return null?

No.

The method is guaranteed to never return null. And all the reads and writes are guaranteed to be atomic. However, threads are not guaranteed to read the latest version of static field obj, and threads are not guaranteed to have a consistent view of the sequence of changes to obj. Arbitrarily many threads may race and observe different values of obj. I would not consider this code "thread safe" as a result, but maybe you have a different definition of "thread safe". That's the problem with asking this question; there's no standard definition of the term that everyone reliably agrees upon.

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1  
To expand on this answer, "thread safe" means "works correctly in a multi-threaded program". The problem is that you need to know the entire program - and what work correctly means - to know what thread safety requirements there are. – configurator Oct 6 '11 at 17:43
    
I have to disagree with the answer. ECMA compliant compiler may eliminate the local variable and then GetMyObject() may return null if ClearMyObject() is executed at the right time. Or is there any official specification that obsoletes the memory model of the original ECMA specification? – mgronber Oct 8 '11 at 6:23

Well, let's reason through this:

public static MyObject GetMyObject() {
        MyObject o = obj;
        if(o == null) {
            o = new MyObject();
            obj = o;
        }
        return o;

}

There is only one return statement. The only way that this method can produce a null return value is if that sole return statement return o has o == null being true when it is executed.

If o is null when return o is executed, that means we came out of the if block with o as null. The only way we can come out of the o block with o as null is if o == null was true when the conditional for the if block was tested (if o == null is false, then o != null is true and since o is a local variable it can not be affected by any other thread. But then o == null being true implies we end up inside the if block and now when the constructor invocation o = new MyObject() returns, we are guaranteed that o is not null. The second statement in the if block, obj = o, does not affect the value of o. Again, since o is a local variable, it doesn't matter if there are multiple threads burning through this code path: each thread has its own o and no other thread can touch any other thread's o.

Therefore, whether or not o == null is true or false, we end up with o == null being false when the if block completes.

Therefore, this method is guaranteed to return a non-null value.

I just want to make sure it is safe to assume GetMyObject() will never return null.

Well, that's fine if that's all you care about. But let's be clear about something. Your method is NOT thread safe. It is perfectly possible for two instances of MyObject to be constructed and two different callers could end up seeing different return values even though it is clear that you intention is to only have one. To fix this, I recommend just using Lazy<T>:

private static Lazy<MyObject> obj;

static Foo() {
    obj = new Lazy<MyObject>(
        () => new MyObject(),
        true
    );
}

public static MyObject GetMyObject() {
    return obj.Value;
}

public static void ClearMyObject() {
    obj = new Lazy<MyObject>(
        () => new MyObject(), 
        true
    );
}
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It won't return null, but it is by no means thread-safe by most accepted definitions. Presumably, you want to store your object into shared state and have that accessed by other threads. In this case, other threads may create their own copies (as you said) and try to store them, but all threads are not guaranteed to see the latest version of that object (or any other thread's version of that object). Likewise, your ClearMyObject() method will not do what you think it will.

Use Lazy<T> instead which will provide what you're looking for.

public static readonly Lazy<MyObject> myObject = new Lazy<MyObject>(() => new MyObject(), true);

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