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I've retrieved a CSS rule from document.styleSheets and am looking now to extract it's properties and values.

cssText = ".expl { position: absolute; background-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); max-width: 150px; }";

Is it possible with regular expressions to retrieve the properties and their appropriate values within a match? Plus, strip the trailing semi-colon.

I want to get the result as follows:

position: absolute // match 1
background-color: rgb(204, 204, 204) // match 2
max-width: 150px // match 3

I've only got to the point where I'm extracting what's within the brackets: (?<={)(.*)(?=}), have no clue with what should I continue.

How do I achieve this?

Thanks in advance!

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Why not split the string in to array and loop through it ? –  vantrung -cuncon Oct 6 '11 at 19:14
    
were you aware that cssText doesn't include the selector? so your example would be cssText = "position: absolute; background-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); max-width: 150px; " –  Joseph Marikle Oct 6 '11 at 19:16
    
You don't need a regexp for this at all. Use the CSS stylesheet DOM. quirksmode.org/dom/tests/stylesheets.html –  Matt Ball Oct 6 '11 at 19:20
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could just split the string on the ;

document.getElementById(id).style.cssText.split(";")

EDIT:

note that the cssText property of a style object does not contain the selector

enter image description here

EDIT 2:

Ok I did a little more digging and it appears you are getting your cssText property from a CSSStyleRule object. This includes the selectors. You can get a semicolon delimited list of the actual rules with a little more tree traversal. You can get the style object with

document.styleSheets[1].cssRules[0].style.cssText;

instead of

document.styleSheets[1].cssRules[0].cssText;

See this drill down:

enter image description here

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Apparently someone is going through and just downvoting everything in this thread. –  Cfreak Oct 6 '11 at 19:21
    
Oh, I guess should've descended one more time, heh.. Because you answered first, plus the effort- answer goes to you. Thanks! –  jolt Oct 6 '11 at 19:31
    
@Tom you're welcome. :) glad to help. –  Joseph Marikle Oct 6 '11 at 19:33
    
Note: It is not 100% reliable. For instance, background-image:url("data:image/png;base64,....."); –  Rob W Feb 13 '13 at 16:55
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Pull everything out between the brackets and then just split it out:

matches = cssrule.match(/{([^}]+)}/;
rules = matches[1].split(';');
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oh! I see why you did that... I think the OP misunderstands though. the cssText property doesn't include the selector. –  Joseph Marikle Oct 6 '11 at 19:15
    
@Joseph, it retrieves selector on Chrome when gathered by cssRules. Maybe rules acts differently. –  jolt Oct 6 '11 at 19:19
    
cssText is just happens to be his variable name. I think that's confusing the issue. It's not the cssText property. –  Cfreak Oct 6 '11 at 19:20
    
@Cfreak no, he said he got it from document.styleSheets... I see what happened... going to update my answer again. –  Joseph Marikle Oct 6 '11 at 19:23
1  
@Tom see my edit –  Joseph Marikle Oct 6 '11 at 19:27
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My regexp is a bit rusty, but something like:

var arr = cssText.replace(/\s/g,'')
                 .replace(/^.*{([^}]+)}.*/,'$1')
                 .match(/([^;]+)/g);

should create:

["position:absolute","background-color:rgb(204,204,204)","max-width:150px"]
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This breaks it all out into named items

\s*(?<rule>(?<selector>[^{}]+){(?<style>[^{};]+:[^{};]+;\s*)+})

If your parser doesn't support named groups (which javascript doesn't) remove the ?<text> from the regex, like this

\s*(([^{}]+){([^{};]+:[^{};]+;\s*)+})

Since your cssText may not contain the css selector, you may want to just split on ;. If it doesn't this works pretty good for parsing stylesheets. I used it in a tool I wrote to inline stylesheets.

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