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I declare this:

int xstartoftable;
void drawframe();

int main()
{
   int xstartoftable = 80-TLENGTH;
   drawframe();

   return 0
}
void drawframe();
{
   gotoXY(xstartoftable - 1, ystartoftable - 1);
}

The problem is that when I debug, the value of xstartoftable is random, not equal to the one in the main(). The code is over 150 lines, this is just the parts that are needed.

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3  
That's not real code. Please post your actual code. –  Kerrek SB Oct 6 '11 at 19:23
1  
Is this your actual code? It doesn't compile for me. –  Kevin Oct 6 '11 at 19:24
    
is somevalue a constant? What is y? At what point in the code are you looking at x? –  Mooing Duck Oct 6 '11 at 19:30
1  
Make sure you don't have int x anywhere in main or i_use_x first. –  Mooing Duck Oct 6 '11 at 19:32
    
got it, thanks Mooing Duck –  Bartlomiej Lewandowski Oct 6 '11 at 19:33
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That's because you redeclare your variable inside main.

int main()
{
   int xstartoftable = 80-TLENGTH; //extra declaration here
   drawframe();

   return 0;
}

Instead just do:

int main()
{
   xstartoftable = 80-TLENGTH; //leave out declaration
   drawframe();

   return 0;
}

This is similar to:

int main()
{
   int x = 0;
   {
      int x = 1;
   }
   printf("%d",x);
   //will print 0
}

On some compilers you might even get an error.

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int xstartoftable = 80-TLENGTH; declares a different xstartoftable that shadows the global one. g++ has a handy -Wshadow warning that catches this stuff.

You want the assignment xstartoftable = 80-TLENGTH; instead.

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