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I created a cross-platform DLL in C++ that compiles on both Windows and Mac OSX. On Windows, I have a C# app that calls the DLL using P/Invoke and on Mac OSX, an objective C app calls the DLL. I have simple functions working just fine but I need a new function that returns an array of integers.

The best example I can find is at Marshal C++ int array to C# and I was able to make it work. However, I would like to modify this example to pass the integer array back as a reference argument instead. The size of the array has to be set at runtime.

Anyone have any suggestions? Thanks!

Here's what I've tried. The pSize is coming back correctly but the list is empty.

In unmanaged c++:

bool GetList(__int32* list, __int32* pSize)
{

    // Some dummy data
    vector<int> ret;
    ret.push_back(5);
    ret.push_back(6);

    list = (__int32*)malloc(ret.size());
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < ret.size(); i++)
    {
            list[i] = ret.at(i);
    }
    *pSize = ret.size();

    return true;
}

In C#:

[DllImport(@"MyDll.dll",
    CharSet = CharSet.Auto, CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
    public static extern bool GetList(out IntPtr arrayPtr, out int size);


    public static int[] GetList() {
        IntPtr arrayValue = IntPtr.Zero;
        int size = 0;

        bool b = GetFrames(out arrayValue, out size);
        // arrayValue is 0 here

        int[] result = new int[size];

        Marshal.Copy(arrayValue, result, 0, size);

        return result;
    }
share|improve this question
    
Please post some code snippets that demonstrate what's not working. –  AaronN Oct 6 '11 at 21:31
    
Hi AaronN - I updated original post –  simon.d Oct 10 '11 at 19:25
    
@user979133: your problem is because list is basically a local variable rather than a pointer to a variable on the .Net side. You could use a ref IntPtr, but I've posted a simpler solution. If you absolutely need to pass arrayValue as a reference let me know. –  user7116 Oct 10 '11 at 19:36
    
The objective-c tag seems misleading. Do you mean C++? –  David Heffernan Oct 10 '11 at 19:47
    
The objective-c tag is because I need to call this C++ DLL from objective-c as well. I think that will be relatively easy though. I'll give it a call now. –  simon.d Oct 10 '11 at 21:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem is the definition of list, it really needs to be an __int32** in order to pass back the address of the allocated array. To breeze through the interop difficulties of pointers-to-pointers, how about you instead return the address of list or null if it fails:

__int32* GetList(__int32* pSize)
{
    // Some dummy data
    vector<int> ret;
    ret.push_back(5);
    ret.push_back(6);

    // per @David's catch, you'll need to allocate the right amount
    __int32* list = (__int32*)malloc(ret.size() * sizeof(__int32));
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < ret.size(); i++)
    {
            list[i] = ret.at(i);
    }
    *pSize = ret.size();

    return list;
}

void RemoveList(__int32* list)
{
    free(list);
}

With the appropriate modifications to your C#:

[DllImport(@"MyDll.dll",
 CharSet = CharSet.Auto, CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
private static extern IntPtr GetList(out int size);

[DllImport(@"MyDll.dll",
 CharSet = CharSet.Auto, CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
private static extern void RemoveList(IntPtr array);

public static int[] GetList()
{
    int[] result = null;
    int size;

    IntPtr arrayValue = IntPtr.Zero;
    try
    {
        arrayValue = GetList(out size);
        if (arrayValue != IntPtr.Zero)
        {
            result = new int[size];
            Marshal.Copy(arrayValue, result, 0, size);
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        // don't forget to free the list
        RemoveList(arrayValue);
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Very nice. I can delete my answer now! –  David Heffernan Oct 10 '11 at 19:39
    
Very nice sixlettervariables. My intention with passing it back as a reference argument is so that it could return an error code, if any. This is simply to be consistent with the signatures of my other functions. If you believe this will cause some major headaches, I could make an exception for this one. –  simon.d Oct 10 '11 at 21:03
    
@simon.d: if you'd like to return an error code, my suggestion would be to either (A) put it in another out parameter, or even better (B) have a separate method which determines the size required and have C# allocate the memory prior to calling the method as Ben suggests. –  user7116 Oct 13 '11 at 14:54

"Caller-allocates" is the only way to make code portable while keeping it maintainable. Not only does your code not change the caller's pointer, but the C# code has no way to free the memory you allocated (malloc-ed memory won't be cleaned up by garbage collection).

If finding the size is quick (doesn't require generating all the output data), just add a second function to return the size.

If you can't get the size until you generate the data, then make one function return the size and a pointer to the content (int**, on the C# side it will be ref IntPtr). And a second function that copies that data to the C# array and frees the native buffer.

share|improve this answer
1  
@DavidHeffernan: Ok, clarified that it's the only maintainable way to be portable. –  Ben Voigt Oct 10 '11 at 19:36
    
+1, ditch the callee side allocating memory. –  user7116 Oct 10 '11 at 19:41

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