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I want to able to pass two joined iterators as one to take advantage of some stl like algorithms (such as TBB) so I am making a custom iterator that joins them but am hitting some stumbling blocks.

I need to specialize iterator, however it won't let me generically specify a template parameter.

Like so:

template<typename IT1, typename IT2>
struct multi_iter : public std::iterator<
                            std::output_iterator_tag,
                            std::pair<IT1::value_type&, IT2::value_type&> >
{
.
:

However it will let me do this, but this is not what I am after

template<typename IT1, typename IT2>
struct multi_iter : public std::iterator<
                            std::output_iterator_tag,
                            std::pair<int&, int&> >
{
.
:

I get this error

multi_iter.cpp:12:53: error: template argument 2 is invalid
multi_iter.cpp:12:55: error: template argument 2 is invalid
multi_iter.cpp:12:55: error: template argument 4 is invalid
multi_iter.cpp:12:55: error: template argument 5 is invalid
.
:

I do have the std::pair

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
You don't specialize std::iterator. You have to write your entire iterator class from ground up. – Kerrek SB Oct 6 '11 at 19:43
    
elaborate please: I should point out that this does work exactly like it should, when I specify the ints – 111111 Oct 6 '11 at 19:44
1  
@KerrekSB, actually, you can specialize std::iterator to get some convenient typedefs: cplusplus.com/reference/std/iterator/iterator . You have to provide all the function implementations though. – bdonlan Oct 6 '11 at 19:46
    
KerrekSB: the above code example was cut down to keep it relevant, I have implemented all of the functions required of output_iterator – 111111 Oct 6 '11 at 19:48
up vote 3 down vote accepted

value_type is a dependent type on IT1, so you have to specify typename there

typename IT1::value_type
share|improve this answer
    
Where does he specialize anything? – jpalecek Oct 6 '11 at 19:47
    
I wish my compiler could of told me that: :S. But thank you that solved it :D – 111111 Oct 6 '11 at 19:50
1  
@111111 : For an explanation of why typename is needed, and how to know when to use it, see this FAQ: What is the template typename keyword used for? – ildjarn Oct 6 '11 at 21:08

Have you tried this?

template<typename IT1, typename IT2>
struct multi_iter : public std::iterator<
                            std::output_iterator_tag,
                            std::pair< typename IT1::value_type&, typename IT2::value_type& > >
{
.
:
share|improve this answer
template<typename IT1, typename IT2>
struct multi_iter : public std::iterator<
                            std::output_iterator_tag,
                            std::pair<IT1::value_type&, IT2::value_type&> >

IT1::value_type is dependent on a type parameter and is a type, so it needs to be designated by typename keyword:

template<typename IT1, typename IT2>
struct multi_iter : public std::iterator<
                            std::output_iterator_tag,
                            std::pair<typename IT1::value_type&, typename IT2::value_type&> >

BTW if you want to "zip" two iterators (that is, iterate two sequences {1, 2} and {"a", "b"}, as (1, "a"), then (2, "b")), have a look at the zip_iterator from the boost.iterators library.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will look at zip_iterator, I did look for something like that. Although TBH this works now, and the disassembly show that it compiles out entirely :D – 111111 Oct 6 '11 at 20:02

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