Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
b1 = Time.now
puts (1..100000).inject(0) { |x, y| x + y }
a1 = Time.now
puts "Time for inject: #{a1 - b1}"

b2 = Time.now
sum = 0
(1..100000).each do |value|
    sum += value
end
puts sum
a2 = Time.now
puts "Time for each: #{a2 - b2}"

The above Ruby code compares two ways of summing up integers. To my surprise, the more elegant inject or reduce approach is outperformed by the other. Why is that the case? Why do people bother using the inefficient inject or reduce? Simply because it's elegant?

PS: Thanks for all the inspiring answers. My intention was to ask what's going on behind the scene that results in the differences.

share|improve this question
1  
If you count nanoseconds in everything you do, you don't have time for anything productive. Also see "premature optimization" (don't use the abridged version though - as the full quote rightfully states, there are some rare cases where things like this do matter). –  delnan Oct 6 '11 at 20:27
    
Thanks. Very thoughtful advice! –  Terry Li Oct 6 '11 at 20:47

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would go with a little math in this case:

require "benchmark"

N = 5_000_000

Benchmark.bmbm do |bm|
  bm.report "inject 1" do
    (1..N).inject(0) { |x, y| x + y }
  end

  bm.report "inject 2" do
    (1..N).inject(:+)
  end

  bm.report "each" do
    sum = 0
    (1..N).each do |value|
      sum += value
    end
  end

  bm.report "sum of finite arithmetic progression" do
    ((1 + N) * N) / 2
  end
end

And the result is:

% ruby sum.rb
Rehearsal ------------------------------------------------------------------------
inject 1                               0.500000   0.000000   0.500000 (  0.507497)
inject 2                               0.320000   0.000000   0.320000 (  0.322675)
each                                   0.370000   0.000000   0.370000 (  0.380504)
sum of finite arithmetic progression   0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000005)
--------------------------------------------------------------- total: 1.190000sec

                                           user     system      total        real
inject 1                               0.500000   0.000000   0.500000 (  0.507697)
inject 2                               0.320000   0.000000   0.320000 (  0.322323)
each                                   0.370000   0.000000   0.370000 (  0.380307)
sum of finite arithmetic progression   0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000004)
% 

A better math is always faster :)

share|improve this answer
1  
The last one is so special. What an inspiration! Thanks. –  Terry Li Oct 6 '11 at 20:52

Yes, code readability is more important than micro-optimisations. The difference is barely noticeable, even when taking the sum of millions of elements. Also, both methods are O(n), so neither will significantly outperform the other as the number of elements increases.

As others have pointed out, inject(:+) is a little faster still. Even if it weren't, pick the one that is easiest on the eye, and don't worry about tiny differences in performance. This will probably not be the bottleneck in your application.

require "benchmark"

N = 5_000_000

Benchmark.bmbm do |bm|
  bm.report "inject 1" do
    (1..N).inject(0) { |x, y| x + y }
  end

  bm.report "inject 2" do
    (1..N).inject(:+)
  end

  bm.report "each" do
    sum = 0
    (1..N).each do |value|
      sum += value
    end
  end
end

Results:

               user     system      total        real
inject 1   0.610000   0.000000   0.610000 (  0.613080)
inject 2   0.370000   0.000000   0.370000 (  0.370892)
each       0.570000   0.000000   0.570000 (  0.568266)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This is very helpful. –  Terry Li Oct 6 '11 at 20:42
1  
And the winner is ... (1+N)*N/2 –  steenslag Oct 6 '11 at 20:46
1  
@steenslag, nice! Although it fails miserably if Range#each has been redefined! ;) –  molf Oct 6 '11 at 20:56

Try the following instead:

puts (1..100000).inject(:+)

Personally I go for elegance, if a single line inject can replace a 3 lines each as long as It doesnt' get messy I'd go with inject.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I just tried this one. Things are getting more interesting: this one outperforms both of mine! What's going on there? –  Terry Li Oct 6 '11 at 20:40
    
A symbol representing the method + is being sent and applied among the elements. Something similar can be done for example with map, ['a', 'b', 'c'].map(&:upcase) would return ['A', 'B', 'C']. Another point I didn't mention, when you don't pass a starting value for inject it uses the first element so basically the 0 on ().inject(0){} it's not necessary for this case. –  derp Oct 6 '11 at 20:52
    
What a lesson! Thanks again. –  Terry Li Oct 6 '11 at 20:55

@derp is right. I recommend you to use the benchmark module the next time like:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

require "benchmark"

Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report { (1..10000000).inject(:+) }
  x.report { sum = 0; (1..10000000).each { |value| sum += value } }
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Didn't know the benchmark module, which seems really handy for profiling code. –  Terry Li Oct 6 '11 at 20:33

It's interesting to note that most or all of the previous answers probably assumed the latest major version of ruby (1.9). In 1.8.7 this difference is more pronounced:

$ ruby -v
ruby 1.8.7 (2011-02-18 patchlevel 334) [i686-darwin10.6.0], MBARI 0x6770, Ruby Enterprise Edition 2011.03
$ ruby bench.rb 

Rehearsal ------------------------------------------------------------------------
inject 1                               3.910000   0.010000   3.920000 (  3.932388)
inject 2                               0.660000   0.000000   0.660000 (  0.662330)
each                                   1.120000   0.010000   1.130000 (  1.126276)
sum of finite arithmetic progression   0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000009)
--------------------------------------------------------------- total: 5.710000sec

                                           user     system      total        real
inject 1                               3.930000   0.010000   3.940000 (  3.956084)
inject 2                               0.680000   0.000000   0.680000 (  0.685073)
each                                   1.110000   0.000000   1.110000 (  1.109675)
sum of finite arithmetic progression   0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000009)

Absolutely agree on readability & maintenance being more important though.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice complement! Thanks. –  Terry Li Oct 7 '11 at 13:21

Ruby is mostly not about performances. If you want performances there are other languages designed for that.

Ruby is all about the pleasure to write elegant code :)

share|improve this answer
    
True. So Matz just invented Ruby for fun? –  Terry Li Oct 6 '11 at 20:45
1  
@TerryLiYifeng, Yep, that's right! –  molf Oct 6 '11 at 22:18
1  
@TerryLiYifeng I guess so :) Ruby is good for the web because it's very convinient, very elegant and very flexible. Fast is NOT one of his attributes even though it's fast interpreted language. –  Nicolas Guillaume Oct 6 '11 at 23:37
    
@NicolasGUILLAUME Thanks –  Terry Li Oct 6 '11 at 23:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.