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I have the following function:

//Function to get random number
public static int RandomNumber(int min, int max)
{
    Random random = new Random();
    return random.Next(min, max);
}

How I call it:

byte[] mac = new byte[6];
for (int x = 0; x < 6; ++x)
    mac[x] = (byte)(Misc.RandomNumber((int)0xFFFF, (int)0xFFFFFF) % 256);

If I step that loop with the debugger during runtime I get different values (which is what I want). However, if I put a breakpoint two lines below that code, all members of the "mac" array have equal value.

Why does that happen?

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(reply to follow-on question added in comments) –  Marc Gravell Apr 20 '09 at 12:36
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8 Answers 8

up vote 381 down vote accepted

Every time you do new Random() it is initialized using the clock. This means that in a tight loop you get the same value lots of times. You should keep a single Random instance and keep using Next on the same instance.

//Function to get random number
private static readonly Random random = new Random();
private static readonly object syncLock = new object();
public static int RandomNumber(int min, int max)
{
    lock(syncLock) { // synchronize
        return random.Next(min, max);
    }
}

Edit (see comments): why do we need a lock here?

Basically, Next is going to change the internal state of the Random instance. If we do that at the same time from multiple threads, you could argue "we've just made the outcome even more random", but what we are actually doing is potentially breaking the internal implementation, and we could also start getting the same numbers from different threads, which might be a problem - and might not. The guarantee of what happens internally is the bigger issue, though; since Random does not make any guarantees of thread-safety. Thus there are two valid approaches:

  • synchronize so that we don't access it at the same time from different threads
  • use different Random instances per thread

either can be fine; but mutating a single instance from multiple callers at the same time is just asking for trouble.

The lock achieves the first (and simpler) of these approaches; however, another approach might be:

private static readonly ThreadLocal<Random> appRandom
     = new ThreadLocal<Random>(() => new Random());

this is then per-thread, so you don't need to synchronize.

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I'm not sure this is the answer in this case, since the question states that the function is working properly when there is no breakpoints near this segment of the code. Of course I agree that he should use one instance of Random object, however I don't think this answers his question. –  David Božjak Apr 20 '09 at 12:18
21  
@Rekreativc - no, re-read it: it is working only when there are break-points, which cause a delay and thus provide different seeds. Without the break-points, everything is equal, i.e. not random, i.e. broken. –  Marc Gravell Apr 20 '09 at 12:19
    
@Marc,could you tell me what the lock(syncLock) does? –  ГошУ Apr 20 '09 at 12:29
1  
Certainly; it synchronizes access, so that if multiple threads are calling your static "RandomNumber" method, they don't trip over each-other and cause an error. Only one thread will ever be inside the "lock" statement at once, since they are all sharing a single lock object (syncLock). –  Marc Gravell Apr 20 '09 at 12:31
1  
@Dan if the object is never exposed publicly: you can. The (very theoretical) risk is that some other thread is locking on it in ways you did not expect. –  Marc Gravell Jan 31 at 22:34
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I would rather use the following class to generate random numbers:

byte[] random;
System.Security.Cryptography.RNGCryptoServiceProvider prov = new System.Security.Cryptography.RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
prov.GetBytes(random);
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21  
I'm not one of the down-voters, but note that standard PNRG do serve a genuine need - i.e. to be able to repeatably reproduce a sequence from a known seed. Sometimes the sheer cost of a true cryptographic RNG is too much. And sometimes a crypto RNG is necessary. Horses for courses, so to speak. –  Marc Gravell Apr 20 '09 at 12:35
2  
According to the documentation this class is thread-safe, so that's something in it's favour. –  Rob Church Apr 26 '13 at 13:51
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1) As Marc Gravell said, try to use ONE random-generator. It's always cool to add this to the constructor: System.Environment.TickCount.

2) One tip. Let's say you want to create 100 objects and suppose each of them should have its-own random-generator (handy if you calculate LOADS of random numbers in a very short period of time). If you would do this in a loop (generation of 100 objects), you could do this like that (to assure fully-randomness):

int inMyRandSeed;

for(int i=0;i<100;i++)
{
   inMyRandSeed = System.Environment.TickCount + i;
   .
   .
   .
   myNewObject = new MyNewObject(inMyRandSeed);  
   .
   .
   .
}

// Usage: Random m_rndGen = new Random(inMyRandSeed);

Cheers.

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3  
I would move System.Environment.TickCount out of the loop. If it ticks over while you are iterating then you will have two items initialized to the same seed. Another option would be to combine the tickcount an i differently (e.g. System.Environment.TickCount<<8 + i) –  Dolphin Jun 25 '09 at 19:03
    
If I understand correctly: do you mean, it could happen, that "System.Environment.TickCount + i" could result the SAME value? –  sabiland Jun 26 '09 at 13:18
    
EDIT: Of course, no need to have TickCount inside the loop. My bad :). –  sabiland Jun 26 '09 at 13:19
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Mark's solution can be quite expensive since it needs to synchronize everytime.

We can get around the need for synchronization by using the thread-specific storage pattern:


public class RandomNumber : IRandomNumber
{
    private static readonly Random Global = new Random();
    [ThreadStatic] private static Random _local;

    public int Next(int max)
    {
        var localBuffer = _local;
        if (localBuffer == null) 
        {
            int seed;
            lock(Global) seed = Global.Next();
            localBuffer = new Random(seed);
            _local = localBuffer;
        }
        return localBuffer.Next(max);
    }
}

Measure the two implementations and you should see a significant difference.

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6  
Locks are very cheap when they aren't contested... and even if contested I would expect the "now do something with the number" code to dwarf the cost of the lock in most interesting scenarios. –  Marc Gravell Sep 18 '09 at 15:57
1  
Agreed, this solves the locking problem, but isn't this still a highly complicated solution to a trivial problem: that you need to write ''two'' lines of code to generate a random number instead of one. Is this really worth it to save reading one simple line of code? –  EMP Apr 15 '10 at 23:07
    
+1 Using an additional global Random instance for getting the seed is a nice idea. Note also that the code can be further simplified using the ThreadLocal<T> class introduced in .NET 4 (as Phil also wrote below). –  Groo May 9 at 8:41
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Good practice you use a static helper class that you can use throughout your application

public static class StaticRandom
{
    private static int seed;

    private static ThreadLocal<Random> threadLocal = new ThreadLocal<Random>
        (() => new Random(Interlocked.Increment(ref seed)));

    static StaticRandom()
    {
        seed = Environment.TickCount;
    }

    public static Random Instance { get { return threadLocal.Value; } }
}

Then you can call it using

StaticRandom.Instance.Next(1, 100);
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My answer from here:

Just reiterating the right solution:

namespace mySpace
{
    public static class Util
    {
        private static rnd = new Random();
        public static int GetRandom()
        {
            return rnd.Next();
        }
    }
}

So you can call:

var i = Util.GetRandom();

all throughout.

If you strictly need a true stateless static method to generate random numbers, you can rely on a Guid.

public static class Util
{
    public static int GetRandom()
    {
        return Guid.NewGuid().GetHashCode();
    }
}

It's going to be a wee bit slower, but can be much more random than Random.Next, at least from my experience.

But not:

new Random(Guid.NewGuid().GetHashCode()).Next();

The unnecessary object creation is going to make it slower especially under a loop.

And never:

new Random().Next();

Not only its slower (inside a loop), it's randomness is... well not really good according to me..

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3  
I do not agree with the Guid case. The Random class implements a uniform distribution. Which is not the case in Guid. Guid aim is to be unique not uniformly distributed (and its implementation is most of the time based on some hardware/machine property which is the opposite of ... randomness). –  Askolein Mar 31 '13 at 13:37
    
@Askolein one, I'm not sure about that. It's hash of guid that we are talking about and not the guid itself. and its pretty random. Have you tested the two? I find much more collision with Random.Next. Two, MS doesn't generate guid based on hardware property anymore. –  nawfal Mar 31 '13 at 13:53
2  
if you cannot prove the uniformity of Guid generation , then it is wrong to use it as random (and the Hash would be another step away from uniformity). Likewise, collisions aren't an issue: uniformity of collision is. Concerning the Guid generation not being on hardware anymore I'm going to RTFM, my bad (any reference?) –  Askolein Mar 31 '13 at 14:18
    
@Askolein I need not prove the uniformity of guid generation as I'm talking about, I repeat, about hash of guid. GetHashCode of .NET guid is based on the string representation of the guid, and not the number itself (which will be impossible anyway), and its quite random as far as I tested. No way it showed some predictable characteristic. If Hash would be another step away from uniformity, isn't it a good thing? Is uniformity a good thing in random discussion? Or did I read your "uniformity" wrongly? –  nawfal Mar 31 '13 at 16:42
3  
There is two understandings of "Random": 1. lack of pattern or 2. lack of pattern following an evolution described by a probability distribution (2 included in 1). Your Guid example is correct in case 1, not in case 2. In opposite: Random class matches case 2 (thus, case 1 too). You can only replace the usage of Random by your Guid+Hash if you are not in case 2. Case 1 is probably enough to answer the Question, and then, your Guid+Hash works fine. But it is not clearly said (ps: this uniform) –  Askolein Mar 31 '13 at 17:33
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There is a much easier way to do this: Thread.Sleep(10); at the end of the random statements. For reasonable data, this works fine. However, I am not sure with huge data. I use it all the time in my code.

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2  
This has the possibility to substantially slow the computer and should never be used to ensure the generation of a Random object with a different seed. 1 millisecond would suffice to change the seed, but even then this approach should not be used when there are better ways to ensure a string of non-identical random numbers. –  JG in SD Oct 25 '13 at 22:55
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There are a lot of solutions, here one: if you want only number erase the letters and the method receives a random and the result length.

public String GenerateRandom(Random oRandom, int iLongitudPin)
{
    String sCharacters = "123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNPQRSTUVWXYZ123456789";
    int iLength = sCharacters.Length;
    char cCharacter;
    int iLongitudNuevaCadena = iLongitudPin; 
    String sRandomResult = "";
    for (int i = 0; i < iLongitudNuevaCadena; i++)
    {
        cCharacter = sCharacters[oRandom.Next(iLength)];
        sRandomResult += cCharacter.ToString();
    }
    return (sRandomResult);
}
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