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I have three fields in a table:

score  status  No.
1,     2,      1
0,     1,      2
0,     0,      1

I need this, to write a C# style pseudo SQL:

rows = empty;

rows = "SELECT * FROM `table` WHERE score = 1"
if (rows.Count > 0) //at least one row
    return rows;

rows = "SELECT * FROM `table` WHERE status = 2"
if (rows.Count > 1) //more than one row 
    return row with MAX(No.) from rows; //ie MAX(No.) where status = 2

 return rows;

I hope I could be clear. In short, select from my table records with score = 1, and if there isn't such a record, return the record where status = 2 and if there are more than one record with status = 2, then return the record with maximum value for No. where status = 2 (if no record at all with status = 2, return empty).

How can I write it in one query? It should be a good learning experience for me. Otherwise I know to breakup into smaller queries and run each one. And I cant go with storeprocs right now..

Edit: Actually my query will have a few more WHERE clauses but identical in both the conditions and that is why I omitted it. Hence, regarding the first condition, there will be only one record returned for now. That is SELECT * FROM table WHERE score = 1 will return just one row for now. And I need / I'll accept answers that gives such a solution too. But the point is you never know, may be in future with some design changes, there could be more rows with score = 1. That is why I went for records instead of record. But ideally the business logic is to have all records with score = 1. For now, record will do. I'm just thinking query will be much simpler if only one row is returned and my teammates can assimilate the code easily.

Final Update: Thank you all guys, you've been very kind :) Many answers worked well, and choosing one is really really daunting. My finding on the answers:

  1. Answers which worked always: @GordonLinoff's, @ZaneBiens's, @ZaneBien's another, @Scen's, @JulienCh.'s (the last 3 being essentially the same, but yet I am not fully aware how those worked :))

  2. Answers which worked only when first condition score = 1 returned only one row: @HannoBinder's, @ShlomiNoach's, @DaniellePaquette-Harvey's. For the moment, I 'll stick with @Danielle's (which is freakingly simple) and later revert if there arises need to have more than one row)

  3. Rest of the answers, I couldn't test as they were either not very specific or not related to MySQL.

  4. @MatthewPK's is not appropriate in the context.

Awarding the bounty and accepting an answer is tough with so many right answers. I chose this one since I felt it is probably more efficient and readable too, but I'll accept @Scen's answer for being downright simple.

share|improve this question
    
Your pseudocode doesn't work. It will never reach the second condition –  Matthew Oct 6 '11 at 20:22
    
@MatthewPK why wouldn't it reach? I just provided a sample set of values. I worry I missed something key? –  nawfal Oct 6 '11 at 20:25
    
In the first case, are you looking for all rows that match the condition or just one? –  Gordon Linoff Jul 10 '12 at 16:18
1  
Okay, great! My solution still stands. Thanks. –  Zane Bien Jul 16 '12 at 6:08
1  
@DaveF, look closer: The very last return at the bottom would return the result of the second query if the condition rows.Count > 1 did not satisfy. If the condition rows.Count > 1 is not satisfied, it skips over the execution of return rows with MAX(no)... and goes straight to the last return instead, which would either return one row or an empty result. If rows.Count > 1 is satisfied, it executes return rows with MAX(no)... and the last return is not executed. –  Zane Bien Jul 16 '12 at 9:37
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12 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
Select *
From scores
Where score = 1
UNION
(
   Select *
   From scores
   Where status = 2 and not exists (Select * from scores where score = 1)
   Order By `No.` desc
   Limit 1
);

I named table as scores.

SqlFiddle (Query with some fake schema so you can see the results): http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/6aac2/1/0

EDIT: edited SQlFiddle to match the fake schema with the one in the question.

share|improve this answer
    
Isnt this @JulienCh. 's answer exactly? Moreover what has and exists (Select * from scores where score = 1 Limit 1) got to do in first query? There is no need of limit 1 in exists queries btw.. –  nawfal Jul 16 '12 at 20:58
    
Well, the reason you posed the question was to create a clear query for others to use, correct? It's not exactly like @JulienCh's answer because the syntax is different. It is the same result, and both will probably turn into the same query in the end anyway. –  Scen Jul 16 '12 at 21:09
    
I get that, nice intention, but avoiding quite "obvious things" will actually clear confusions in my experience. Ya towards the end your queries are different, and I like yours more, but otherwise they are just the same :) –  nawfal Jul 16 '12 at 21:15
    
I also didn't see his answer. I voted it up after I read it. :P –  Scen Jul 16 '12 at 21:15
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This seems hard, since you are returning a variable number of rows in the two cases.

The following query combines all possible rows, and then check on the presence of the first type to see which type should be returned.

select *
from ((SELECT 'SCORE' as matchtype, t.*
       FROM `table` t
       WHERE score = 1
      ) union all
      (SELECT 'STATUS' as matchtype, t.*
       FROM `table` t join
            (select max(`No.`) as maxno
             from `table` 
             WHERE status = 2
           ) tsum
           on t.`No.` = tsum.maxno
       WHERE status = 2
      )
     ) t cross join
     (select count(*) as cnt
      from `table`
      where score = 1
     ) const
where matchtype = (case when const.cnt > 0 then 'SCORE' else 'STATUS' end)

Note: the return set includes the MatchType. To get rid of this, you would need to include the full list of desired columns.

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1  
This fixes the bug in my own solution, where only one row is returned (clarification was only made at later stage). –  Shlomi Noach Jul 10 '12 at 17:29
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This query will solve your question:

SELECT *
  FROM `your_table`
WHERE
  status = 2 OR score = 1 
ORDER BY
  if(score = 1, 1, 0) DESC, 
  if(status = 2, 1, 0) DESC,
  `No.` DESC
LIMIT 1;

As opposed to other answers:

  • It does not assume positive values for the column No.
  • This is MySQL syntax (you have tagged as mysql)

But do feel free to give the credit/reputation to KSiimson, who laid out the right path. His query has two bugs, unfortunately.

Also note that said query cannot utilize any index on the ORDER BY clause, since we wrap columns with functions. Indexes are unlikely to be used on the FROM clause because of the OR condition.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the credit! Unfortunately I was doing this from Starbucks yesterday - the Wifi there had serious issues and I couldn't finish editing the query. I finished it at work this morning and saw your post; I like how it uses a separate order by clause for both score and status, so it will work even if No. is negative. –  KSiimson Jul 10 '12 at 16:01
    
My own ORDER BY clause has some redundancy; it can be shortened by much. But the way it is laid right now is as readable as I can make it. Cheers –  Shlomi Noach Jul 10 '12 at 17:25
    
But now I see from recent comments to the question that the author wants to get ALL rows matching the case of score = 1. So this solution is still incorrect... –  Shlomi Noach Jul 10 '12 at 17:28
add comment

Here is a much more efficient solution that should work for you:

SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE score = 1 

UNION ALL

(
    SELECT a.* 
    FROM tbl a
    INNER JOIN
    (
        SELECT COUNT(1) AS s1exists FROM tbl WHERE score = 1
    ) b ON b.s1exists = 0
    WHERE a.status = 2
    ORDER BY a.no DESC
    LIMIT 1
)

Breakdown:

How this query works is that the first SELECT in the UNION returns all rows where score = 1. The second SELECT returns the maximum row (based on the no field) where status = 2 AND where there isn't a single row where score = 1. Whether there is only one row or multiple rows where status = 2, the maximum row is the same thing for both.

This satisfies all of your conditions that you had specified:


  • One or more rows exists where score = 1: First SELECT returns all of those rows; second SELECT returns empty (even if there are rows with status = 2).

  • No rows exist where score = 1 and there's one row where status = 2: First SELECT returns empty; second SELECT returns one row (which is the same thing as the max row).

  • No rows exist where score = 1 and there's more than one row where status = 2: First SELECT returns empty; second SELECT returns the max row where status = 2.

  • No rows exist at all where either score = 1 or status = 2: First row returns nothing; second row also returns nothing, rendering an empty result.
share|improve this answer
1  
I had tried solving this question for a couple days similar to the way you did it here but couldn't figure out how to properly join the inner join. I like the subtle solution here of b ON b.s1exists = 0... That was what I couldn't figure out. Nice work. I like this solution over the others. –  Shawn Jul 16 '12 at 20:37
    
Yes, and I regret awarding bounty to the other answer. This deserved it more I feel now. Basically I was in a dilemma to choose between your two answers and somehow I went for the other. I thought the other was more efficient. Do you know which method of yours is more efficient? –  nawfal Jul 16 '12 at 22:14
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Totally untested, most probably very inefficient, but might work:

SELECT * FROM `table`
WHERE score=1

union all

SELECT * FROM `table`
WHERE status=2 
and NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM `table` WHERE score=1)
and `No.` = (
             SELECT max(`No.`) FROM `table`
             WHERE status=2 
            )
share|improve this answer
    
This would work. –  Shawn Jul 16 '12 at 20:35
    
this should work ;) –  nawfal Jul 16 '12 at 20:55
add comment

Assuming only positive integers are used in No.:

select   * 
from     `table` 
where    status = 2 or score = 1 
order by if(score = 1, -2, if(status = 2, -1)), `No.` desc 
limit    1;

What I did was I created an expression that the rows will be ordered by. The expression will return -2 if score is one, -1 when only status is one. As a fallback, we have sorting by No. field in descending order.

See Shlomi Noach's solution for an improvement on this that works when No. field has a negative value.

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add comment

I left my original answer, but it isn't as efficient as the one below:

/*
Query returns rows with score=1 when they exist or nothing
*/
select score, status, no from temp where score=1

UNION

/*
Query returns rows with status=2 when they exist and when there are no rows
 with score=1 or nothing otherwise.
*/
(

select t1.score, t1.status, t1.no from

( /* <subquery> */

(
select score, status, no from temp
where status=2 and (select max(score) from temp where score=1) is null
) as t1

join

(
select max(no) as maxNo from temp where status=2
) as t2

on t1.no=t2.maxNo

) /* </subquery> */

limit 1

)

You can use indexes to make it more efficient. Also, I'm not certain if the query in the conditional statement (which checks if there are any rows with score=1) gets executed once or more than once. To be on the safe side, you can replace it with @c and prepend the line:

set @c:=(select max(score) from temp where score=1);

     

Original answer:

/*
Query returns rows with score=1 when they exist or nothing
*/
select score, status, no from temp where score=1

UNION

/*
Query returns nothing when there are rows with score=1,
 rows with status=2 when they exist and when there are no rows with score=1, or
 nothing otherwise.

Does this by adding weights to rows.
Rows with score=1 have greater weights than rows with status=2.
Joins rows with greatest weights to rows with status=2.
*/
( /* <query> */

select t.score, t.status, t.no from
( /* <joins> */

/* Gets greatest weight */
(
select max(if(score=1, 2, if(status=2, 1, -1))) as w
from temp
) as t1

join

/*  Joined on rows with status=2 using assigned weights */
(
select score, status, no, if(score=1, 2, if(status=2, 1, -2)) as w
from temp
where status=2
) as t

on t.w=t1.w

join

/*  Joined on rows with greatest No. for rows with status=2 */
(
select max(no) as maxNo
from temp
where status=2
) as t2

on t.no=t2.maxNo

) limit 1 /* </joins> (Only returns one row with max No.) */

) /* </query> */
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add comment

You can fetch the first result from this query:

-- If there is no row with Score 1, then the first SELECT will return nothing.
-- If there is a row with Score 1, then you will get it.
-- No row with Score 1. If there is one row with Status 2, then you will get it.
-- No row with Score 1. If there is more than one row with Status 2, then you will get the one with the highest No.

SELECT 1 AS ColumnOrder, Table.*
FROM   Table
WHERE  Score = 1
LIMIT  1
UNION ALL
SELECT   2 AS ColumnOrder, Table.* 
FROM     Table 
WHERE    Status=2 
ORDER BY ColumnOrder, No DESC
LIMIT    1 
share|improve this answer
    
I am askin for mysql. plus 1 still –  nawfal Jul 12 '12 at 20:48
1  
This is such a freaky solution!! +100 ;) of course it works only if score = 1 have to return just one record. But still... –  nawfal Jul 16 '12 at 19:37
add comment

Here is my other solution but I'm posting this one as another answer because it uses a completely different technique (conditional conditions in the WHERE clause) rather than using UNION.

This avoids having to use UNION operators which is maybe what you're after (even though technically using UNION of two statements counts as "one" query). Another advantage is that it is DBMS agnostic and doesn't rely on ORDER BY X / LIMIT 1 which is primarily a MySQL-based technique to retrieving minimum and maximum rows:

SELECT a.*
FROM tbl a
CROSS JOIN (SELECT COUNT(1) AS score1cnt FROM tbl WHERE score = 1) b
CROSS JOIN (SELECT MAX(no) AS maxno FROM tbl WHERE status = 2) c
WHERE
    CASE WHEN b.score1cnt > 0 THEN a.score = 1
         WHEN b.score1cnt = 0 AND c.maxno IS NOT NULL THEN a.status = 2 AND a.no = c.maxno
         ELSE 0
    END

You can fiddle around with a SQLFiddle Demo which includes both of my answers.

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add comment
IF EXISTS(Select * From `table` Where score = 1)
Begin
    Select * From `table` Where score = 1;
End
Else
Begin
    Select *
    From `table`
    Where status = 2
    Order by `No.` desc
    LIMIT 1
End
share|improve this answer
1  
I would like to do away with store procs. Isn't this one? Also accept my edit to make it mysql compatible –  nawfal Jul 16 '12 at 20:19
    
Yeah, sorry, didn't know you were trying to avoid stored procs. I made another answer for this. –  Scen Jul 16 '12 at 20:46
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I cannot (yet?) see any elegant solution to your problem in only one query.

Besides, I'm not sure what your actual problem really is; your sample code seems clear but I find it hard to extrapolate a problem that will cover your requirements from

my query will have a few more WHERE clauses but identical in both the conditions

Apart from that, I'm surprised that up to now no one proposed the use of a group by clause. Not going into the syntactical details of MySQL here, but basically

select score, status, MAX(No) as No
from tbl 
group by score, status

will give you exactly the single one record per 'group' with the maximum value for No.

Put into a subquery the above select can be refined, for example

select *
from ( [*] ) as tbl
where
   (score = 1)
OR (score != 1 AND status = 2)
OR /* ... more conditions of the above type... */
order by /* ... */
limit 1

([*] stands for the grouped select statement from above here)

Add or remove (a variant of) an order by score DESC, status DESC and/or limit 1 clause as needed and you should be very close to what you need.

share|improve this answer
    
this is really nice way of looking at it, and the most straightforward of them all. But need not be that efficient.. Let me test it with some samples and get back to u –  nawfal Jul 16 '12 at 19:24
    
unfortunately this didnt work, the reason being that the inner group by behaving the weird way mysql is known for.. –  nawfal Jul 16 '12 at 21:12
    
I cannot seem to reproduce a problem with the inner query's group by. - Can you give some detail on what results you get? –  Hanno Binder Jul 17 '12 at 16:17
    
I have, btw, edited my answer to make it more clear that order by and limit clauses are to be applied solely to the outer query. –  Hanno Binder Jul 17 '12 at 16:20
    
Hanno, this doesnt work. I am not sure if I can convincingly state why. See this sqlfiddle link sqlfiddle.com/#!2/e1206 . The problem is here that the limit clause at the end of the query decides ultimately how many rows should be returned, and hence it cant be a variable number of records. Furthermore, the logic itself is wrong, 'cos an OR condition basically fetches both when score=1 and also when score != 1 and status = 2. You can see the link for more –  nawfal Jul 17 '12 at 18:01
show 4 more comments
SELECT SCORE, STATUS, NO from (
    SELECT * , RANK() OVER (PARTITION BY [STATUS] ORDER BY SCORE ASC, NO DESC) AS RANK
    FROM `table`
    WHERE  score = 1 OR [status] = 2 ) x
WHERE X.Rank = 1
share|improve this answer
    
are u sure rank() is supported by mysql? –  nawfal Jul 10 '12 at 4:46
2  
@nawfal I'm sure its not –  Conrad Frix Jul 12 '12 at 18:40
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