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Is there a way to force my dbms (oracle) to treat a string as SQL code?

For example, in the queryselect num from numbers where num between '5 and 7', I would want '5 and 7' to be evaluated as SQL.

Edit:

This is what my query currently looks like:

select num from tbl_1 
where num between (select min(num) from tbl_2) 
                    and 
                  (select max(num) from tbl_2);

I'm wondering whether there is a way of doing this with only one subquery.

share|improve this question
    
If the num column is indexed, those subqueries will be really cheap. –  Donal Fellows Oct 6 '11 at 21:13

5 Answers 5

Don't. Just. Don't. Do you really want to bring more monstrosities such as this into the world?

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There's no way to translate a string into criteria in SQL (for good reasons).

However, if you're dead set on reducing the number of sub-queries, the following query is equivalent to yours.

SELECT num
FROM        tbl_1 t1
       JOIN (SELECT MIN(num) min_num, MAX(num) max_num FROM tbl_2) t2
         ON t1.num BETWEEN t2.min_num AND t2.max_num

However, even in if tbl_2.num is not indexed, the performance improvement to be gained is so small that it's not worth the loss of readability. I put 10,000 consecutive values in tbl_2 and 100,000 consecutive values in tbl_1 and ran each query 1000 times. The difference in total execution time was less than 5 milliseconds (well within the margin of error).

My test:

CREATE TABLE tbl_1 (num NUMBER)
/

CREATE TABLE tbl_2 (num NUMBER)
/

INSERT INTO tbl_1
   SELECT     LEVEL
   FROM       DUAL
   CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 100000
   /

INSERT INTO tbl_2
   SELECT     LEVEL
   FROM       DUAL
   CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 10000
   /

ANALYZE TABLE tbl_1 COMPUTE STATISTICS
/
ANALYZE TABLE tbl_2 COMPUTE STATISTICS
/

DECLARE
   v_repititions CONSTANT PLS_INTEGER := 1000;

   CURSOR cur_old IS
      SELECT num
      FROM   tbl_1
      WHERE  num BETWEEN (SELECT MIN(num) FROM tbl_2) 
                     AND (SELECT MAX(num) FROM tbl_2);

   r_old         cur_old%ROWTYPE;

   CURSOR cur_new IS
      SELECT num
      FROM        tbl_1 t1
             JOIN (SELECT MIN(num) min_num, MAX(num) max_num FROM tbl_2) t2
               ON t1.num BETWEEN t2.min_num AND t2.max_num;

   r_new         cur_new%ROWTYPE;
   i             PLS_INTEGER;
   v_start_time  timestamp;
   v_end_time    timestamp;
BEGIN
   v_start_time   := SYSTIMESTAMP;

   FOR i IN 1 .. v_repititions LOOP
      FOR r_old IN cur_old LOOP
         NULL;
      END LOOP;
   END LOOP;

   v_end_time     := SYSTIMESTAMP;
   DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('Old Query: ' || TO_CHAR(v_end_time - v_start_time));
   v_start_time   := SYSTIMESTAMP;

   FOR i IN 1 .. v_repititions LOOP
      FOR r_new IN cur_new LOOP
         NULL;
      END LOOP;
   END LOOP;

   v_end_time     := SYSTIMESTAMP;
   DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('New Query: ' || TO_CHAR(v_end_time - v_start_time));
END;
/
share|improve this answer
    
10,000 and 100,000 rows are a rather small tables :) –  a_horse_with_no_name Oct 6 '11 at 21:53
    
@a_horse_with_no_name: There's a limit to the time and resources I'm willing to throw at such an artificial problem. And I did provide the code, should someone wish to try it with a larger sample. –  Allan Oct 6 '11 at 22:01
    
sorry I didn't mean to offend you. I just think that this number of rows is most probably cached after one table scan. –  a_horse_with_no_name Oct 6 '11 at 22:15
    
@a_horse_with_no_name: No offense taken and you're probably right. However, I still think the performance difference between the two queries is minimal (even less if the obvious indexes are in place). –  Allan Oct 7 '11 at 12:47

two ways:

Not Preferred
1) Dynamic SQL: Create one string of concatenating everything the EXECUTE it. Note that this is vulnerable to injection

Preferred
2) Parse the input string for the two parameters 5 and 7, on opposite sides of the delimited "and" then use them as parameters in

 SELECT... WHERE NUM BETWEEN @pMin AND @pMax
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This is generally a really bad idea. Unless you have a really really good reason for doing this. Passing strings to your database as parts of a query is a guaranteed way to end up with an injection vulnerability or a gaping chasm of a pit to fall into that could really mess up your database if a programmer who comes along later makes an error.

If you want dynamic queries, look to programming constructs that are designed to do that, like Criteria queries in JPA.

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I don't think Oracle can do what you want, but you can write

select num
from numbers
where num between &1 and &2;

This will cause Oracle to prompt you for substitution values, though this might not work in your context. What exactly are you trying to do?


Based on your comment, I assume you have a column name range_vals storing values like '1 AND 2'

select num
from numbers,
  (select instr(range_vals,' ',1,1) as low_pos, instr(range_vals,' ',2,1) as hi_pos, range_vals
  from table_of_range_vals
  where [some condition]) range_subq
where numbers.num between to_number(substr(range_subq.range_vals,1,low_pos)) --parse out the low end of the range
                  and     to_number(substr(range_subq.range_vals,hi_pos,length(range_subq.range_vals))) --parse out the high-end of the range.
;

The basic idea here is to use some string manipulation in the subquery to find the two start and end values of the range in the string. I'm not sure if this will run exactly, but I hope the idea is clear?

share|improve this answer
    
I want to construct a range drawn from two values coming from the same column in the same table. So, instead of having two (nearly identical) subqueries, I'm thinking maybe I can return the range as a string from a single subquery. –  Isaac Kleinman Oct 6 '11 at 20:30
    
I showed my objective in OP –  Isaac Kleinman Oct 6 '11 at 20:50

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