Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I try to checkout a remote branch.

And then make a commit and then push.

I get fatal: No destination configured to push to error when I do a 'git push'.

Here is the sequence of commands I use:

$ git checkout remote/test-1.6
$ git checkout -b test-1.6
$ git commit -a -m "commit message"
$ git push
fatal: No destination configured to push to.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
2  
Try git push remote test-1.6 –  Mike Lentini Oct 6 '11 at 22:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to specify both the remote alias and the branch you wish to push (if there are many branches and you only want to push one).

From the docs for push:

[to commit to a remote repo] you run git push [alias] [branch] which will attempt to make your [branch] the new [branch] on the [alias] remote.

If you wish to push all branches to the remote repo (or only have one to push), you can omit the branch specifier and do a

git push [alias]

For your specific case, as Mike specified in his comment,

git push remote test-1.6

should work.

share|improve this answer

You probably already have a remote for your repository, but your new branch hasn't been configured to use it. This should work:

git push --set-upstream remote test-1.6

Having done that once, there is now a tracking branch in place and you can simply use "git push" in future -- assuming you've configured upstream push of the current branch as the default, like so:

git config --global push.default tracking

Or (preferred) as of git 1.7.4:

git config --global push.default upstream
share|improve this answer

right you have to first add a remote

git remote add myremote  [url]

then you will be able to push using : git push myremote master (or any other branch)

share|improve this answer

try to add a remote repo with

git remote add remote http://.../repo.git

then you can do a

git push remote test-1.6
share|improve this answer
    
simplest and worked perfectly. many thanks. –  katsh Sep 7 '12 at 22:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.