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What is the difference between == and .equals() in Scala, and when to use which?

Is the implementation same as in Java?

EDIT: The related question talks about specific cases of AnyVal. The more general case is Any.

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@Ben I think that other question should be marked as duplicate considering the date asked. Also, I feel the two questions are different. – Jus12 2 days ago
up vote 89 down vote accepted

You normally use ==, it routes to equals, except that it treats nulls properly. Reference equality (rarely used) is eq.

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5  
Does it also apply when using Java libraries? – Jus12 Oct 6 '11 at 22:50
12  
It does. For instance new java.util.ArrayList[Int]() == new java.util.ArrayList[Int](), as equals on ArrayList is content equality. – Didier Dupont Oct 6 '11 at 23:07
3  
There is also some strange behavior around Int and Long and == versus .equals(). The same number as Int and as Long return true for == but false for equals. So == does not always route to equals. – Harold L Jun 3 '13 at 22:14
6  
More interestingly, Both 3 == BigInt(3) and BigInt(3) == 3 are true. But, 3.equals(BigInt(3)) is false, whereas BigInt(3).equals(3) is true. Therefore, prefer using ==. Avoid using equals() in scala. I think == does implicit conversion well, but equals() does not. – Naetmul Aug 21 '13 at 13:21

== is a final method, and calls .equals, which is not final.

This is radically different than Java, where == is an operator rather than a method and strictly compares reference equality for objects.

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There is an interesting difference between == and equals for Float and Double types: They treat NaN differently:

scala> Double.NaN == Double.NaN
res3: Boolean = false

scala> Double.NaN equals Double.NaN
res4: Boolean = true
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