Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I get the return value of that.whatever back from the closure? Instead of:

this.setCanvas = function(files){
  var numItems = files.length - 1;
  this.items = {};

  var i = 0;
  for(i=0;i<=numItems;i++)
  {
    var file = files[i];
    var reader = new FileReader(); 

    reader.onload = (function(i) { 
      return function(e) { 
        var something = that.whatever();
        items[i] = something;
      }; 
    })(i);  

    reader.readAsDataURL(file);
  }

console.log(items); 
}

I need items[i] defined. If I console.log items[i] outside of the closure it is undefined.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can augment your code to keep track of the number of files loaded. This way, when the last file has been loaded, you can invoke an ultimate completion handler:

  this.setCanvas = function(files) {
    var numItems = files.length - 1;
    var itemsLoaded = 0; // Initialize to zero

    var items = [];

    var i = 0;
    for(i=0;i<=numItems;i++) {

      var file = files[i];
      var reader = new FileReader(); 

      reader.onload = (function(i) { 
        return function(e) { 
          var something = that.whatever();
          items[i] = something;

          if(++itemsLoaded == numItems) {
            // At this point all files will have been loaded.
            allLoaded();
          }
        }; 
      })(i);  

      reader.readAsDataURL(file);
    }

    function allLoaded() {
      // Now we can analyze the results
      console.log(items); 
    }
  }

I also changed items to be an Array instead of an Object.

Also if you want to be a little more clever, you could decrement numItems and check for zero instead of creating a new itemsLoaded variable.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I ended up passing items out via a function. Your example got me moving in the right direction. I still don't understand all this fully but that's a whole nother issue ; ) –  Calvin Froedge Oct 7 '11 at 0:19
    
Just made a minor update. Instead of doing this.items = [], I just made it a variable instead, this allows the closure (handler) to access it more easily; otherwise the onload handler would not know which this to use when trying get ahold of items. FYI, the onload handler is called by the JavaScript engine and you'll find that the this reference points to the reader instance instead. –  Peter Oct 7 '11 at 0:25

The problem isn't the closure; it's the callback. Whatever needs to use the value of that.whatever needs to be executed in the callback.

share|improve this answer

There are a couple things you need to change here. First set this.items to an array. Next assign this to self so it can be referenced in the closure. Next assign the something to self.items[i] instead of items[i]. Finally use this.items in the console.log

this.setCanvas = function(files){
  var self = this;
  var numItems = files.length - 1;
  this.items = [];

  var i = 0;
  for(i=0;i<=numItems;i++)
  {
    var file = files[i];
    var reader = new FileReader(); 

    reader.onload = (function(i) { 
      return function(e) { 
        var something = that.whatever();
        self.items[i] = something;
      }; 
    })(i);  

    reader.readAsDataURL(file);
  }

    console.log(this.items); 
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.