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I have a timer that counts up from the time a user encounters that activity

I am currently using a Chronometer set during onCreate (initially started only when certain conditions are met). But I need the chronometer to keep counting upward until the app and all its views are closed (I have an "Exit" function to do that).

The problem is that the Chronometer gets reset to zero on every time I look at another tab and come back to its activity. (This has to do with the oncreate, but I dont know the way around it)

I didn't find an intuitive way to save the chronometer's state or countup in the background on its own (or to perhaps keep track of the time on my own and update the chronometer visually at a different point in time)

One idea I had was to start the Chronometer with a service and let the service keep counting , while having a textview in the existing activity update using the chronometer's current time tally as a string

any insight on a known approach to this problem be appreciated!

This is further complicated because this is an activity in a tabhost, and tabhosts call both onPause and onResume every time you load a view, so this breaks lifecycle functions.

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5 Answers 5

There are a number of ways to persist the time. The easiest one I have found is to store the time in the Intent that was used to create the original activity via getIntent().putExtra("START_TIME", floatvalue). You may retrieve the value with getIntent().getFloatExtra("START_TIME", 0f). Doing it this way has a number of benefits:

  • It doesn't break the Activity LifeCycle and does not require a Context.
  • It can be passed easily between other Activities and Applicaitons.
  • It persists among Pauses and Stops.
  • It doesn't require special listeners.
  • It doesn't create any new objects (the Intent is the one used to create the Activity the first time).

This solution is great for persisting in a Tabbed Activity, or across Dialogs, etc. It has some limitations if leaving the Application to a more memory intensive one, but only if your Activity is destroyed (due to memory).

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This is a technique I use in several of my apps called Intent Recycling. I have a couple of papers on it and other techniques surrounding Intents. –  Fuzzical Logic Oct 11 '11 at 23:55

When you switch to a different activity the previous one is paused (onPause, asand so on, in attached image) when you came back to the activity it is resumed, but occasionaly when dalvik runs out of memory your Activity object can be deleted when ton showing.

If you keep your application data in the Activity instance you might loose it accidentally, please read this Activity Lifecycle http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/Activity.html

enter image description here

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I'm familiar with this, now do you have a solution to how to persist the chronometer's time? Perhaps have it on a different thread or save the time in sharedpreferences another way to restore it later –  CQM Oct 11 '11 at 15:47
    
Usually I make a singleton class that holds all my runtime variables. It's quite easy then to add setters, getters and listeneres to that values, so for example a new activity that wants to show current values can register to changes of that falue on Resume and unregister onPause, classic MVC model –  michael Oct 11 '11 at 16:52
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because of my Tabhost, the lifecycle functions could not be relied on.

What I did was make the chronometer a static global in a central class, and added a ontabchangedlistener within my tabhost that checked to see if the tab being changed to was the tab with the chronometer. If this was true then it stores the Long value of the chronometer's current time.

 tabHost.setOnTabChangedListener(new OnTabChangeListener(){

        @Override
        public void onTabChanged(String arg0) {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub
            if(arg0.contentEquals("homeGroup"))
            {
                //store time in centralhelper.java
                                    //stopWatch is of type Chronometer
                                    //stopWatchLastTime is of type Long and is initially set to zero. Chronometer uses milliseconds to determine time, will never be zero after set
                CentralHelper.stopWatchLastTime = CentralHelper.stopWatch.getBase();
            }
        }

    });

When my homeGroup view loads, the onResume() function is called, there is a condition here to retrieve the time for the chronometer to resume counting from. Despite the fact that a tabhost will call both onPause() and onResume() in EVERY load outside of normal lifecycle functions, they still get called before onCreate()

   public void onResume(){
    super.onResume();

    //update Chronometer with time stored in tabchangelistener
    if(CentralHelper.stopWatchLastTime!=0)
        CentralHelper.stopWatch.setBase(CentralHelper.stopWatchLastTime);
}

this allowed me to do a similar check in onCreate()

    if(CentralHelper.stopWatchLastTime!=0)
    {

        CentralHelper.stopWatch.start(); //this is where it resumes counting from the base set in onResume()
    }
    else
    {
        CentralHelper.stopWatch.start();
        CentralHelper.stopWatch.setBase(SystemClock.elapsedRealtime());
    }
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This approach is tested and it works really well. Try this:

Take a boolean volatile variable which will control your thread(start/stop). Take three text views, hour, min and sec text views, and remove chronometer completely. Update your UI using a Handler Write the following code.

public void timeUpdate()
{
    timerThread = new Thread(new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() {
            while(continueThread){
                Date newDate = new Date();
                if(((newDate.getTime()) - date.getTime()) > 1000){
                    secondCounter = secondCounter+1;
                    mHandlerUpdateSec.post(mUpdateSec);
                    System.out.println("Inside the Theread ..."+secondCounter);
                    if(secondCounter > 59){
                        minuteCounter = minuteCounter + 1;
                        mHandlerUpdateMinute.post(mUpdateMinute);
                        secondCounter = 0;
                        if(minuteCounter > 59){
                            hourCounter = hourCounter + 1;
                            mHandlerUpdateHour.post(mUpdateHour);
                            minuteCounter = 0;
                        }
                    }
                }
                try{
                    timerThread.sleep(1000);
                }catch (Exception e) {
                    // TODO: handle exception
                }
            }
        }
    });
    timerThread.start();
}

The continueThread is a boolean volatile variable. Setting it to false will stop the thread. The timerThread is an instance of thread. There are three counters, hour, min and sec counters which will give you the latest time values. The handlers are updated as follows.

final Handler mHandlerUpdateSec = new Handler();
final Runnable mUpdateSec = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        String temp = "" + secondCounter;
        System.out.println("Temp second counter length: " + temp.length());
        if(temp.length() == 1)
            secTextView.setText("0" + secondCounter);
        else
            secTextView.setText("" + secondCounter);
    }
};
final Handler mHandlerUpdateMinute = new Handler();
final Runnable mUpdateMinute= new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        String temp = "" + minuteCounter;
        System.out.println("Temp second counter length: " + temp.length());
        if(temp.length() == 1)
            minTextView.setText("0" + minuteCounter);
        else
            minTextView.setText("" + minuteCounter);
    }
};
final Handler mHandlerUpdateHour = new Handler();
final Runnable mUpdateHour = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        String temp = "" + hourCounter;
        System.out.println("Temp second counter length: " + temp.length());
        if(temp.length() == 1)
            hourTextView.setText("0" + hourCounter);
        else
            hourTextView.setText("" + hourCounter);
    }
};

Now, whenever you want to start the timer, set continueThread to true and call timeUpdate(). To stop it, just do continueThread = false. To start the thread again, set continueThread to true and call timeUpdate() again. Make sure you update the counters accordingly while you start/stop the timer.

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this will be helpful when I don't have a Chronometer, thanks –  CQM Oct 17 '11 at 23:26
    
Excellent! Just a quick change. When changing the textviews I changed the if condition to if(secondCounter < 10) [and minuteCounter/hourCounter]. This way you won't need a new String and a new String.lenght() every second, minute and hour. I think this could give a good boost to the performances. Also, I've adapted it to use EventBus, so I can use this unbound from textviews. –  David Corsalini Feb 6 '13 at 0:55

You could save the start time in a sharedpreferences (or file, etc.) and establish your count-up from that (rather than starting at 0) in onResume().

Your UI may need some changes to handle the fact that you will have to reset the start time, since it could theoretically count forever.

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This is what I tried to do, but my lifecycle functions are also happening out of order. (my activity calls onPause() when I go away from it, AND when it resumes.... I even tried onStop(), and it gets called both times) –  CQM Oct 11 '11 at 16:33

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