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Can someone explain to me the (*this) pointer and demonstrate how it would be used as far as an object calling another object of the same class. What I don't understand is how you would refer to two numbers in a member function of different 2 different objects of the same variable name. For example, multiplying two numbers.

a.Multiply(b);
//....
Numbers::Numbers Multiply(Numbers auggend)
{
}
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
this pointer:

The member functions of every object have access to a pointer named this,which points to the object itself.When we call a member function,it comes into existence with the value of this set to the address of the object for which it was called.Using a this pointer any member function can find out the address of the object of which it is a member.It can also be used to access the data in the object it points to. Example:

void setdata(int ii)
{
   i=ii;         // one way to set data
   this->i=ii;   // another way to set data
}
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+1 for the answer –  desprado Oct 7 '11 at 5:06
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this pointer stores the address of the class instance and can be used to initialise values

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(*this) is a pointer to your instatniation of a class. In your example if Numbers class had a data value "value":

a.Multiply(b);
....
Numbers::Numbers Multiply(Numbers auggend)
{
  return (this->value) * (auggend.value);
}
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note that return value * auggend.value is also correct –  Simon Oct 7 '11 at 4:11
    
so (this->value), is pointing to the "value" variable in object "a"and "(auggend.value);" is refering to the "value" variable in the multiply paramater? –  user954004 Oct 7 '11 at 4:14
    
Indeed they are. The reason for (this*->*value) vs (auggend*.*value) is left as an exercise for the reader ;-). –  whitey04 Oct 7 '11 at 4:19
    
The suspense is killing me ,cant wait.thanks –  user954004 Oct 7 '11 at 4:21
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First off, your example doesn't look quite correct. I believe that should be:

Numbers Numbers::Multiply(Numbers auggend)
{
}

Anyway, with that said, this is simply a variable of type Numbers * const that points to your member variable. So from your example a.Multiply(b), this will hold the value of &a.

Let's say you had some other function that took a Numbers *:

void DoSomething(Numbers *num);

You can then call that function with this:

Numbers Numbers::Multiple(Numbers auggend)
{
    DoSomething(this); 
    DoSomething(&auggend);
}
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class A{
   int num;
   void foo(int num)
   {
      num = 10; //local variable num is set to 10
      this->num = 10 ; //class member num is set to 10
   }
};
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