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The following is an in-lined(defined inside header file) static member function. Is the literal string "MyClass" always guaranteed to be in static memory? If not, will this not be returning a pointer in stack?

const char * className()
{
return "MyClass";
}

Edit:

How about this?

const RWCString& className()
{
return "MyClass";
}

RWCString is an string class which has a implicit constructor which takes a const char*. http://www.roguewave.com/portals/0/products/sourcepro/docs/11/html/toolsref/rwcstring.html

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I've never even heard of RWCString... XD But I assume it's fine since the constructor will be required to take care it. –  Mysticial Oct 7 '11 at 5:50
    
@Mysticial but the function will create a new RWCString each call using the implicit costructor. Every call to className() will return a new reference –  onof Oct 7 '11 at 7:00
    
I stand corrected. My comment is wrong since you can't return by reference like that. –  Mysticial Oct 7 '11 at 7:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first example:

const char * className()
{
  return "MyClass";
}

is fine. "MyClass" is a literal of type char const[8] which lifetime begins before your code is invoked and ends after your code is done, so no issue.

The second example, however, will not work.

const RWCString& className()
{
  return "MyClass";
}

It requires and object of type RWCString to be constructed within the function in order to be able to return a reference to it. However what is built as a local variable or temporary within a function cannot be returned by reference, so you get undefined behavior (if it compiles).

You can very simply turn it into a "good" function though:

const RWCString& className()
{
  static RWCString const N = "MyClass";
  return N;
}

Here I create a local static object N which will be constructed the first time the function is called. Because it is static its lifetime extends past the call so it is fine to return a reference to it.

EDIT: as Steve pointed out, temporary is more appropriate that local variable here.

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Quick question: What's the purpose of returning by reference (const RWCString&) if the value can't be made inside of the function? (since it will fall out of scope) –  Mysticial Oct 7 '11 at 7:03
    
@Mysticial: in general ? The value could be obtained from one of the arguments. For example: std::string const& find(std::map<int, std::string> const&);, there the result is one of the value in the map. Since the map is provided by the caller, you can safely return by reference (to this caller). It is easy however to pass the reference to far up the call-chain and end up at a point where it does not make sense, which is why references and pointers are hard to deal with. –  Matthieu M. Oct 7 '11 at 7:11
    
Ah, that make sense. Thanks for the response. –  Mysticial Oct 7 '11 at 7:14
    
"what is built as a local variable" -- or in this case what is built as a temporary. –  Steve Jessop Oct 7 '11 at 8:41
    
@SteveJessop: exact, thanks :) –  Matthieu M. Oct 7 '11 at 9:32

Nope. This is completely defined. The string isn't on the stack. It's in global memory. So the pointer it returns is valid. (even better: you declared it const)

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