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I have a couple of tables that i join together when i execute the following query:

SELECT article.year, authors.last_name, count(DISTINCT article.id) as count FROM
article LEFT JOIN authors ON article.id = authors.id WHERE authors.last_name =
'bloggs' GROUP BY article.year

For some reason, this is taking between 6 and 7 seconds to return the results which seems unbelievably slow to me given the relatively small number of rows it has to deal with. Am I doing something wrong here?

If I run an EXPLAIN on the query I get the following:

select_type    table    type   possible_keys  key    key_len    ref    rows    extra
=====================================================================================
simple         article  all    null           null    null      null   762     using temporary; using filesort
simple         authors  all    null           null    null      null   5061    using where; using join buffer

Both tables are InnoDB. I'm running this from my local machine which is fairly low spec (windows xp, 1 ghz, 1gb ram) but even so, I would have thought this would be quicker. If I load a few more rows into the tables it starts to take minutes rather than seconds.

Any thoughts?

Table structures below:

Article:

field    type       null    key    default    extra
=======================================================
id       int        yes            null
year     char(20)   yes            null
volume   char(20)   yes            null
issue    char(20)   yes            null
title    text       yes            null

Authors:

field      type       null    key    default    extra
=======================================================
id         int        yes            null
last_name  char(100)  yes            null
initials   char(10)   yes            null
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Do you have an index on authors.last_name? Do you have indexes on the columns used for the Joins? Do you have index on authors.last_name? If you have no indexes at all, it will be slower and slower as the tables grow in size. –  ypercube Oct 7 '11 at 8:33
    
Post yout tables structure as well. (I meant authors.last_name and article.year.) –  ypercube Oct 7 '11 at 8:36
    
No, currently I do not have any indexes on the columns being used in the query, good point. I hadn't added them as it seemed like a fairly small table to deal with at this stage, but I'll try adding indexes on the affected columns and see if it solves anything... –  DrNoFruit Oct 7 '11 at 8:38
    
You should also consider making year an INT instead of char(20). It's 4 bytes (or 2 if you make it SMALLINT) instead of 20. Less space, less space for the indexes and noone can add a row with year='my gosh, 2012'. –  ypercube Oct 7 '11 at 9:06
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try adding indexes on columns authors.last_name and authors.id.

But, are you sure your query is ok? shouldn't it look like :

SELECT article.year, authors.last_name, count(DISTINCT article.id) as count FROM
article LEFT JOIN authors ON article.author_id = authors.id WHERE authors.last_name =
'bloggs' GROUP BY article.year

If so, an index on articles.author_id would be required - although, not for this query, but as a general best practice

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1  
As @Tudor mentions, you need an article.author_id field which would be a FOREIGN KEY to author(id). You also need to declare which field is the PRIMARY KEY (in both tables), and further indexes on any more fields that are used in WHERE or ON. –  ypercube Oct 7 '11 at 8:51
    
Thanks guys, I'll have a play and let you know the results. –  DrNoFruit Oct 7 '11 at 8:53
1  
Just to let you all know that I added indexes on the relevant columns and it made a massive difference, so thanks for that. Feel a bit silly for not having done it in the first place, I just wasn't expecting it to be so important on such a small table. –  DrNoFruit Oct 8 '11 at 19:24
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As Tudor said, add indexes. You can also extract the group by.

SELECT * FROM (SELECT article.year, authors.last_name, count(DISTINCT article.id) as count FROM
article LEFT JOIN authors ON article.author_id = authors.id WHERE authors.last_name =
'bloggs') GROUP BY article.year

Doing this you are first fetching by the join, and in the set, applying the aggregate function.

And explain to see where is the spot to the improvement.

Font of the suggestion:

http://kccoder.com/mysql/join-group-by-performance/

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Why do you think this change would help? –  ypercube Oct 7 '11 at 9:03
    
You link's example has only one table - and the GROUP BY - inside the subquey and the JOIN in the exterior query. You have it reversed. –  ypercube Oct 7 '11 at 9:17
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