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I'm writing an application configuration module that uses XML in its files. Consider the following example:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Settings>
    <PathA>/Some/path/to/directory</PathA>
    <PathB>/Another/path</PathB>
</Settings>

Now, I'd like to override certain elements in a different file that gets loaded afterwards. Example of the override file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Settings>
    <PathB>/Change/this/path</PathB>
</Settings>

When querying the document (with overrides) with XPath, I'd like to get this as the element tree:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Settings>
    <PathA>/Some/path/to/directory</PathA>
    <PathB>/Change/this/path</PathB>
</Settings>

This is similar to what Python's ConfigParser does with its read() method, but done with XML. How can I implement this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could convert the XML into an instance of Python class:

import lxml.etree as ET
import io

class Settings(object):
    def __init__(self,text):
        root=ET.parse(io.BytesIO(text)).getroot()
        self.settings=dict((elt.tag,elt.text) for elt in root.xpath('/Settings/*'))
    def update(self,other):
        self.settings.update(other.settings)

text='''\
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Settings>
    <PathA>/Some/path/to/directory</PathA>
    <PathB>/Another/path</PathB>
</Settings>'''

text2='''\
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Settings>
    <PathB>/Change/this/path</PathB>
</Settings>'''    

s=Settings(text)
s2=Settings(text2)
s.update(s2)
print(s.settings)

yields

{'PathB': '/Change/this/path', 'PathA': '/Some/path/to/directory'}
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In the end I did go with JSON, but I implemented this as well when researching on the subject. Creating your own classes to represent the configuration is the cleanest way. –  eclaird Oct 21 '11 at 13:00

Must you use XML? The same could be achieved with JSON much simpler: Suppose this is the text from the first config file:

text='''
{
  "PathB": "/Another/path", 
  "PathA": "/Some/path/to/directory"
}
'''

and this is the text from the second:

text2='''{
  "PathB": "/Change/this/path"
}'''

Then to merge the to, you simply load each into a dict, and call update:

import json
config=json.loads(text)
config2=json.loads(text2)
config.update(config2)
print(config)

yields the Python dict:

{u'PathB': u'/Change/this/path', u'PathA': u'/Some/path/to/directory'}
share|improve this answer
    
JSON is not out of the question, but I thought XML would be handy with XPaths and all that. –  eclaird Oct 7 '11 at 10:03

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