Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a plugin for Eclipse to create Java code such as:

Person person = new Person();
person.setName("name");

List<Address> addresses = new ArrayList<Address>();
Address address = new Address("Address");
addresses.add(address);
person.setAddresses(addresses);

, from an object while debugging.

The context is that I want to define some testing to validate converters and as I get those quite complex objects (with lists of lists of objects...) to be converted from a WS, I'ld rather get the Java code automatically while setting a breakpoint and indicating the object I want to process.

Thanks a lot!!

share|improve this question
    
I don't think you'll find one, as there're multiple ways of generating objects (do you pass the parameters in the constructor, setters/getters or even other methods?) –  Augusto Oct 9 '11 at 14:56
    
But it could be done through reflection invoking the default constructor and then the setters (supposing u are dealing with Java Beans) –  Juan Carlos Blanco Martínez Oct 9 '11 at 18:40

1 Answer 1

Adding comment as answer as it's quite long.

Yes it's possible to build a plugin like you mentioned, but pure javabeans are quite a smell in OO, so the solution would only apply to a small set of developers (and that's is possible one of the reasons why there's no plugin that does this).

There are even more issues with this (as you mentioned) if the object tree is complex. Where does the plugin stops generating the data? Another issue is that the tests wouldn't be maintainable, imagine the scenario where you do a small change in one of your javabeans, and then need to rewrite N tests to cope with the new property, although the tests have nothing to do with tha property (this is bad test smell)

If you want to build test data check the Test Data Builder Pattern (TDB). It's a good approach when you can default most of the values and you only need to change a few specific values. It's also quite maintainable and very readable.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't agree with "this is bad test smell". Imagine you have a WS client, that needs to test a method retrieving some data from a WS. In the future this might evolve (adding/removing some fields, changing the structure...) so you have to make sure your client will still be working. –  Juan Carlos Blanco Martínez Nov 5 '11 at 12:08
    
Also keeping on saying this could be done by reflection. Going through the object's fields, identifying a set of known types (String, HashMap... that we would know what code to generate) and for the ones unknown, try some default strategy (invoke the default constructor and then the setters) and from that generating the right code. I'm sure we would face issues but as I said it would be focused on Java Beans and also it could be customized adding mappings between Types and the right code to simulate the object. –  Juan Carlos Blanco Martínez Nov 5 '11 at 12:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.