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I'm playing with static keyword. In the code below I can't figure out why x save it's before state and increment. I was expecting to print 1 tree times. As I know a such behaivor should happen if I declare x as static.

void print_it(void);

    int main (int argc,  const char * argv[])
    {
        print_it();
        print_it();
        print_it();
        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
    }

    void print_it(void)
    {
        int x;
        printf("%d\n", x++);
    }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have not initialized x to any value. Therefore, the initial value in x would be garbage and as it happens, this garbage increments itself every time because it is probably using the same memory location everytime.

Try changing your code to this:

void print_it(void);
int main (int argc,  const char * argv[])
{
    print_it();
    print_it();
    print_it();
    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

void print_it(void)
{
    int x = 0;
    printf("%d\n", x++);
}
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I think he left out a static declaration and initialization of x, and he wants to refer to that x in his print_it function, so the line int x = 0; should be removed completely and x should be the global. –  Paulpro Oct 7 '11 at 10:37
    
"because it is probably using the same memory location everytime." Exactly right, the variable is on the stack and since there is no intervening code to wipe it out, it stays the same. –  Steve Wellens Oct 7 '11 at 10:38
    
Thanks Aamir! This is what I'm looking for. –  jingo Oct 7 '11 at 10:39
    
sometimes initialize automatic variable has always 0 value. its not for same memory location. –  Mr.32 Oct 7 '11 at 10:57

That's because all 3 stacks of function print_it occupy same address space.

//    before print_it()                   1st print_it();             back to main()                 2nd print_it();            and so on...
//
//    ..................                ..................          ..................               .................. 
//    ... Stack data ...                ... Stack data ...          ... Stack data ...               ... Stack data ... 
//    ..................                ..................          ..................               ..................
//                       <- stack_P     |call  print_it()|                            <- stack_P     |call  print_it()| 
//                                              ||                                                           ||               
//                                              \/                                                           \/
//                                      ... some  data ...          ... some  data ...               ... some  data ...
//                                      | 4 bytes  of x  |          | X still  here  |               | Old  X  Bytes  |
//                                      ... some  data ...          ... some  data ...               ... some  data ...
//                                                        <- stack_P                                                   <- stack_P
//  
//                                       x got incremented                                         x got incremented again

Try this main:

int main (int argc,  const char * argv[])
{
    print_it();
    int a;
    a += 1; 
    print_it();
    int b;
    b += 2
    print_it();
    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
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The initial value of uninitialized local variables is undefined. In this case, the value is just sitting on the the stack and getting reused because you are calling the same function three times in a row. If you call other functions that have local variables, the value will change because the other functions will use the same stack memory.

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No man you are wrong. Variable is not keeping its value. you are not initializing int x so each time it has garbase value & you are incrementing that & printing that incremented garbase value.

You are getting same but standard says that it may not be same.

in one million times you get same value still that it can not be accepted that local variable holds on its value.

on differe system with different environment may your program has not same value..!

Edit : in most of the case local variable has value 0. so its not retaining its previous value.

void print_it(void);

int main (int argc,  const char * argv[])
{
    print_it();
    print_it();
    print_it();
    return 1;
}

void print_it(void)
{
    int x;
    printf("starting %d\n", x);
    x++;
    printf("after increment %d\n", x);
}

if variable keep its state then it output should be

starting 0
after increment 1
starting 1
after increment 2
starting 2
after increment 3

but its real output is

starting 0
after increment 1
starting 0
after increment 1
starting 0
after increment 1

so now get point..??

local variable dont keep its state but if initialized local variable has always value 0.

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