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There is a function of a 2D geometrical shape and 1D interval,

f(s, i) = Py (s ⋂ i×(-∞,∞))

It calculates intersection of shape with infinite vertical rectangle (determined by given interval i = [x1, x2)) and then projects it to Y axis.

Is there a good name for this function?

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closed as off-topic by Jean-François Corbett, finnw, ughoavgfhw, mhlester, Harry Johnston Mar 8 '14 at 1:15

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center." – finnw, ughoavgfhw
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
For Java implementation: CalculateIntersectionOfShapeWithInfiniteVerticalRectangleDeterminedByInterval(sh‌​ape,interval). FORTRAN implementation: CIOSWIVRDBI(S,I) or if that is too long: ISR(S, I) :-p –  NealB Oct 7 '11 at 14:00
2  
@NealB, almost +1, the first letter for the Java name should be lower case :) –  Blindy Oct 7 '11 at 14:07
    
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about mathematics rather than programming. –  Harry Johnston Mar 8 '14 at 1:15

2 Answers 2

GetIntersection seems like an obvious candidate...

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Well, that's not only intersection. I was hoping that there is a well-known geometrical operator which acts like this function, so I can use its name. –  alkar Oct 7 '11 at 13:52
    
@user713303, my thinking is, name the function at least in the ballpark and then thoroughly comment it its the header (in whatever way your language of choice does that). Function names are easy to refactor if months down the line you think of a better one. –  Blindy Oct 7 '11 at 14:08
    
it's already been named yProjection, so it's already about renaming –  alkar Oct 7 '11 at 14:57

If you don't like Blindy's answer maybe you can call it:

ProjectoToYAfterIntersectingInfiniteRectangle(x1,x2)

But I would go with just GetIntersection as Blindy said +1

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