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I have a namespace that creates a series of enums used through my application with associated print statements, like so:

namespace NS {
    enum EnumA { A1, A2, A3 };
    enum EnumB { B1, B2, B3 };

    inline std::string toString(const EnumA key) {
        switch(key) {
        case A1: return "A1";
        case A2: return "A2";
        case A3: return "A3";
        }
        return "UNKNOWN";
    }

    // .. same for EnumB
}

// this is the part I would like to templatize
inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& s, const NS::EnumA key) {
    s << NS::toString(key);
    return s;
}
inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& s, const NS::EnumB key) {
    s << NS::toString(key);
    return s;
}

Is it possible to templatize the stream operator to work with any NS enum so I only have to have one? Like:

template <typename T>
inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& s, const NS::<T> key) {
    s << NS::toString(key);
    return s;
}
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the only things in namespace NS are toString-capable types, you can put your operator<< in the namespace, thusly:

namespace NS {
  enum EnumA { A1, A2, A3 };
  enum EnumB { B1, B2, B3 };

  inline std::string toString(const EnumA key) {
    ...
  }
  inline std::string toString(const EnumB key) {
    ...
  }

  template <typename T>
  inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& s, const T key) {
    std::operator << (s, NS::toString(key));
    return s;
  }

}

A complete program is here.

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I don't know how that works, but it does, especially since printing to the stream directly doesn't work (even if it is in the namespace). –  steveo225 Oct 7 '11 at 14:52
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The obvious approach will result in your overload being considered for all types; this will result in calls being ambiguous for all types, since templates are not choosy. So you need some way to tell the compiler that your enum is the right type of enum, and to ignore all the rest; a traits class is probably the easiest way to do that.

namespace NS {
  enum EnumA { };

  template<typename T>
  struct is_ns_enum : std::false_type { };

  template<>
  struct is_ns_enum<EnumA> : std::true_type { };
}

From there, you can use SFINAE to implement your function.

template<typename T>
inline typename std::enable_if<is_ns_enum<T>::value, std::ostream&>::type
operator <<(std::ostream& s, const T&) {
  ...
}

This way, the overload is considered for any types you specialize is_ns_enum for, but is discarded for all other types, preventing that slew of ambiguous overload errors.

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+1 That seems to work, however, I end up writing the same amount of code, which I always forget to do, hence wanting a template. –  steveo225 Oct 7 '11 at 14:49
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If you templatize the stream type as well, this will work:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

namespace NS {
    enum EnumA { A1, A2, A3 };
    enum EnumB { B1, B2, B3 };

inline std::string toString(const EnumA key) {
        switch(key) {
        case A1: return "A1";
        case A2: return "A2";
        case A3: return "A3";
        }
        return "UNKNOWN";
    }

inline std::string toString(const EnumB key) {
        switch(key) {
        case B1: return "B1";
        case B2: return "B2";
        case B3: return "B3";
        }
        return "UNKNOWN";
    }
};

template <class Stream, typename T>
inline std::ostream& operator<<(Stream& s, T key) {
    s << NS::toString(key);
    return s;
}

int main()
{
    cout << NS::A2;
    cout << NS::B3;
}
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