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Lets say we have 5 tables

Fact_2011
Fact_2010
Fact_2009
Fact_2008
Fact_2007

each of which stores only transactions for the year indicated by the extension of the table's name.

We then create a separate index over each of these tables with the column "Year" as the first column of the index.

Lastly, we create a view, vwFact, which is the union of all of the tables:

SELECT * FROM Fact_2011
UNION
SELECT * FROM Fact_2010
UNION
SELECT * FROM Fact_2009
UNION
SELECT * FROM Fact_2008
UNION
SELECT * FROM Fact_2007

and then perform a queries like this:

SELECT * FROM vwFact WHERE YEAR = 2010

or in less likely situations,

SELECT * FROM vwFact WHERE YEAR > 2010 

How efficient would these queries be compared to actually partitioning the data by Year or is it essentially the same? Is having an index by Year over each of these pseudo partitioned tables what is needed to prevent the SQL engine from wasting more than a trivial amount of time to determine that a physical table that contains records outside of the sought date range is not worth scanning? Or is this pseudo partitioning approach exactly what MS partitioning (by year) is doing?

It seems to me that if the query executed is

SELECT Col1Of200 FROM vwFact WHERE YEAR = 2010 

that real partitioning would have a distinct advantage, because the pseudo partitioning first has to execute the view to pull back all of the columns from the Fact_2010 table and then filter down to the one column that the end user is selecting, while with MSSQL partitioning, it would be more of a direct up front selection of only the sought column's data.

Comments?

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possible duplicate of Partitioning by Year vs. separate tables named Data_2011, Data_2010, etc –  JNK Oct 7 '11 at 15:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have implemented partitioned views on SQL Server 2000 with great success

Make sure that you have a check constraint on each table that will restrict the year column to the year. So on the Fact_2010 table it would be Check Year = 2010

then also make the view UNION ALLs not just UNION

now when you query the view for one year it should just access 1 table, you can verify this with the execution plan

if you don't have the check constraints in place it will touch all the tables that are part of the view

that real partitioning would have a distinct advantage, because the pseudo partitioning first has to execute the view to pull back all of the columns from the Fact_2010 table and then filter down to the one column that the end user is selecting

If you have the constraints in place the optimizer is smart enough to just go the tables you need

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Assuming your "Make sure" comment is true (which I expect it will is) :-), that is a great morsel of info to know and to me, a surprising fact! An after-thought: Wouldn't an index view by YEAR over the UNION of all FACT tables be more apprpriate than a separate index by Year over each physical table? Also, while UNION ALL is more explivit and the better choice, I don't see how UNION could return different results given the constraint. Comments? Thanks so much for your answer. I loved it. –  ChadD Oct 7 '11 at 15:46
    
An indexed view has to be maintained so all your updates deletes and inserts will be slower..also you need more space in your DB to store that view –  SQLMenace Oct 7 '11 at 15:55
    
@Chad: Regarding UNION ALL vs UNION, it's not about whether the results would be different, but rather about getting rid of the absolutely unnecessary sorting that UNION does (because of the implied DISTINCT). –  Andriy M Oct 7 '11 at 17:31
    
@Andriy: Excellent point. thanks –  ChadD Oct 7 '11 at 21:20

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