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I'm making my constructors a bit more strict by removing some of my empty constructors. I'm pretty new to inheritance, and was perplexed with the error that I got: Base Class Doesn't Contain Parameterless Constructor. How can I make A2 inherit from A without there being an empty constructor in A. Also, for my own personal understanding, why is A2 requiring an empty constructor for A?

Class A{
    //No empty constructor for A
    //Blah blah blah...
}

Class A2 : A{
    //The error appears here
}
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1  
you cannot create an object of a class with no constructor. if you do not want the parameterless one create a constructor which accepts some parameters. –  Davide Piras Oct 7 '11 at 15:55
    
I should have been more clear in the OP, both class A and A2 have constructors with parameters, I just wanted to remove the parameterless ones so that to create an instance of a class, you need all of the necessary parameters for the class to work. This seems like the intuitive thing to do, is this a smart way to go about doing things? –  sooprise Oct 7 '11 at 18:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 56 down vote accepted

In class A2, you need to make sure that all your constructors call the base class constructor with parameters.

Otherwise, the compiler will assume you want to use the parameterless base class constructor to construct the A object on which your A2 object is based.

Example:

class A
{
    public A(int x, int y)
    {
        // do something
    }
}

class A2 : A
{
    public A2() : base(1, 5)
    {
        // do something
    }

    public A2(int x, int y) : base(x, y)
    {
        // do something
    }

    // This would not compile:
    public A2(int x, int y)
    {
        // the compiler will look for a constructor A(), which doesn't exist
    }
}
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2  
I've never seen this before, but this is exactly what did the trick. Thank you so much! –  sooprise Oct 7 '11 at 17:15

Example:

class A2 : A
{
   A2() : base(0)
   {
   }
}

class A
{
    A(int something)
    {
        ...
    }
}
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It's common and easier to read to put the base class first. –  Henk Holterman Oct 7 '11 at 15:59
    
It's even more common to put the base class in a different file. –  Joe Apr 4 '12 at 19:29

If your base class doesn't have a parameterless constructor, you need to call one from your derived class using base keyword:

class A
{
    public A(Foo bar)
    {
    }
}

class A2 : A
{
    public A2()
        : base(new Foo())
    {
    }
}
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It has to call some constructor. The default is a call to base().

You can also use static methods, literals, and any parameters to the current constructor in calls to base().

  public static class MyStaticClass
    {
        public static int DoIntWork(string i)
        {
            //for example only
            return 0;
        }
    }

    public class A
    {
        public A(int i)
        {
        }
    }

    public class B : A
    {
        public B(string x) : base(MyStaticClass.DoIntWork(x))
        {
        }
    }
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Because if A has no default constructor then the constructor of A2 needs to call base() with the arguments to the constructor of A. See this question: Calling base constructor in c#

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