Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to test if a string ends with a a digit. I expect the following Java line to print true. Why does it print false?

System.out.println("I end with a number 4".matches("\\d$"));
share|improve this question
    
This may also be related to your question: stackoverflow.com/questions/627545/… –  AdrianoKF Oct 7 '11 at 16:52

5 Answers 5

Your regex will not match the entire string but only the last part. Try the below code and it should work fine as it matches the entire string.

System.out.println("I end with a number 4".matches("^.+?\\d$"));

You can test this for a quick check on online regex testers like this one: http://www.regexplanet.com/simple/index.html. This also gives you what you should use in the Java code in the results with appropriate escapes.

The .+ will ensure that there is atleast one character before the digit. The ? will ensure it does a lazy match instead of a greedy match.

share|improve this answer
    
There's no point doing a lazy match in this case. We want the .+ to gobble up the whole string right away. Then it will back off one position to compare the last character to \d, which is the only thing we care about. –  Alan Moore Oct 7 '11 at 22:58

In Java Regex, there's a difference between Matcher.find() (find a match anywhere in the String) and Matcher.matches() (match the entire String).

String only has a matches() method (implemented equivalent to this code:

Pattern.compile(pattern).matcher(this).matches();

), so you need to create a pattern that matches the full String:

System.out.println("I end with a number 4".matches("^.*\\d$"));
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, more simply: System.out.println("I end with a number 4".matches(".*\\d")); but the '$' should mean I don't have to specify .* at the beginning. Why doesn't '$' at the end work? –  Thor Oct 7 '11 at 16:50
    
The extra backspace removes the escape behaviour. Hence "^.*\\d$" may not work. You can test this in online regex testers like this: regexplanet.com/simple/index.html –  Kash Oct 7 '11 at 16:51
    
@Kash in Java, the extra backspace is necessary –  Sean Patrick Floyd Oct 7 '11 at 16:55
2  
@Thor both the ^ and the $ are entirely optional when doing full matches. They have no effect whatsoever and are only there for clarity –  Sean Patrick Floyd Oct 7 '11 at 16:57
    
@Sean, you are right, there is no verbatim in Java like C# has @. My bad. –  Kash Oct 7 '11 at 16:59

Your RegEx expression is slightly off. Try this:

System.out.println("I end with a number 4".matches("^.*\\d$"));

You can also simply test like this if you are evaluating a line at a time:

System.out.println("I end with a number 4".matches(".*\\d"));

Your original expression, without .* only tested to see whether the string was a number and did not account for text that may precede that number. That's why it was always false.

The following does evaluate to true:

System.out.println("4".matches("^\\d$"));
share|improve this answer
System.out.println("I end with a number 4".matches(".*\\d")); // prints true

or

String s = "I end with a number 4";
System.out.println(Character.isDigit(s.charAt(s.length()-1)));  // prints true
share|improve this answer

try this:

System.out.println("I end with a number 4".matches(".*\\d\$"));
share|improve this answer
    
Won't compile, \$ is illegal in Java –  Sean Patrick Floyd Oct 7 '11 at 16:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.