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I am currently evaluating strategy for storing supplier catalogs. There can be multiple items in catalog vary from 100 to 0.25million. Each item may have multiple errors. application should support browsing of catalog items

  • Group by Type of Error, Category, Manufacturer, Suppliers etc..
  • Browse items for any group, Should be able to sort and search on multiple columns (partid, names, price etc..)

Question is when i have to provide functionality of "Multiple SEARCH and SORT and GROUP" how should i create index.

According to mysql doc & blogs for index it seems that creating index on individual column will not be used by all query.

Creating multi column index is even not specific for my case.

There might be 20 - 30 combination of group search & sort.

How do i scale and how can i make search fast.

Expecting to handle 50 million records of data.

Currently evaluating on 15 million of data.

Suggestions are welcome.

CREATE TABLE CATALOG_ITEM
(
    AUTO_ID BIGINT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
    TENANT_ID VARCHAR(40) NOT NULL,
    CATALOG_ID VARCHAR(40) NOT NULL,
    CATALOG_VERSION INT NOT NULL,
    ITEM_ID VARCHAR(40) NOT NULL,
    VERSION INT NOT NULL,
    NAME VARCHAR(250) NOT NULL,
    DESCRIPTION VARCHAR(2000) NOT NULL,
    CURRENCY VARCHAR(5) NOT NULL,
    PRICE DOUBLE NOT NULL,
    UOM VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL,
    LEAD_TIME INT DEFAULT 0,
    SUPPLIER_ID VARCHAR(40) NOT NULL,
    SUPPLIER_NAME VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
    SUPPLIER_PART_ID VARCHAR(40) NOT NULL,
    MANUFACTURER_PART_ID VARCHAR(40),
    MANUFACTURER_NAME VARCHAR(100),
    CATEGORY_CODE VARCHAR(40) NOT NULL,
    CATEGORY_NAME VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
    SOURCE_TYPE INT DEFAULT 0,
    ACTIVE BOOLEAN,
    SUPPLIER_PRODUCT_URL VARCHAR(250),
    MANUFACTURER_PRODUCT_URL VARCHAR(250),
    IMAGE_URL VARCHAR(250),
    THUMBNAIL_URL VARCHAR(250),
    UNIQUE(TENANT_ID,ITEM_ID,VERSION),
    UNIQUE(TENANT_ID,CATALOG_ID,ITEM_ID)
);

CREATE TABLE CATALOG_ITEM_ERROR
(
    ITEM_REF BIGINT,
    FIELD VARCHAR(40) NOT NULL,
    ERROR_TYPE INT NOT NULL,
    ERROR_VALUE VARCHAR(2000)
);
share|improve this question
    
I think we need the db schema to answer this. –  llazzaro Oct 7 '11 at 17:34
    
go with sphinx from the beginning –  Pentium10 Oct 7 '11 at 18:07
    
please find table definition –  Dhruv Patel Oct 7 '11 at 18:59

1 Answer 1

If you are determined to do this solely in MySQL, then you should be creating indexes that will work for all your queries. It's OK to have 20 or 30 indexes if there are 20-30 different queries doing your sorting. But you can probalby do it with far less indexes than that.

You also need to plan how these indexes will be maintained. I'm assuming because this is for supplier catalogs that the data is not going to change much. In this case, simply creating all the indexes you need should do the job nicely. If the data rows are going to be edited or inserted frequently in realtime, then you have to consider that with your indexing - then having 20 or 30 indexes might not be such a good idea (since MySQL will be constantly having to update them all). You also have to consider which MySQL storage engine to use. If your data never changes, MyISAM (the default engine, basically fast flat files) is a good choice. If it changes a lot, then you should be using InnoDB so you can get row level locking. InnoDB would also allow you to define a clustered index, which is a special index that controls the order stuff is stored on disk. So if you had one particular query that is run 99% of the time, you could create a clustered index for it and all the data would already be in the right order on disk, and would return super super fast. But, every insert or update to the data would result in the entire table being reordered on disk, which is not fast for lots of data. You'd never use one if the data changed at all frequently, and you might have to batch load data updates (like new versions of a supplier's million rows). Again, it comes down to whether you will be updating it never, now and then, or constantly in realtime.

Finally, you should consider alternative means than doing this in MySQL. There are a lot of really good search products out there now, such as Apache Solr or Sphinx (mentioned in a comment above), which could make your life a lot easier when coding up the search interfaces themselves. You could index the catalogs in one of these and then use them provide some really awesome search features like full text and/or faceted search. It's like having a private google search engine indexing your stuff, is a good way to describe how these work. It takes time to write the code to interface with the search server, but you will most likely save that time not having to write and wrap your head around the indexing problem and other issues I mentioned above.

If you do just go with creating all the indexes though, learn how to use the EXPLAIN command in MySQL. That will let you see what MySQL's plan for executing a query will be. You can create indexes then re-run EXPLAIN on your queries and see how MySQL is going to use them. This way you can make sure that each of your query methods has indexes supporting it, and is not falling back to a scanning your entire table of data to find things. With as many rows as you're talking about, every query MUST be able to use indexes to find its data. If you get those right, it'll perform fine.

share|improve this answer
    
i understand your point. i have certain transaction requirement for error mgmt and versioning of items. InnoDB will require for tht. SPHINX needs MyISAM. Apache Solr as stand alone server i am already evaluating. Thnx for your suggestion. –  Dhruv Patel Oct 7 '11 at 19:17

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