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I need to communicate with a device that uses SSL. It used to use socket to communicate with my Delphi app, but now I'd like to use security communication with the device.

So, is there a TServerSocket and TClientSocket equivalent component that I can use SSL?

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2 Answers 2

There's no built-in direct equivalent in Delphi. You can use Indy with either OpenSSL or SecureBlackbox SSL classes however Indy is not a drop-in replacement for TServerSocket/TClientSocket, as they use very different coding models. Or you can use TElSecureClientSocket and TElSecureServerSocket classes of SecureBlackbox - they are descendants and direct replacements for TClientSocket and TServerSocket respectively. Note: SecureBlackbox is our product.

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Saying that "Indy is not compatible with TServerSocket/TClientSocket" is a bit misleading. A TClientSocket can communicate with a TIdTCPServer, and a TServerSocket can communicate with a TIdTCPClient, just fine. TCP is TCP regardless of what wrapper is being used on each end. To use SSL with TServerSocket/TClientSocket, you have to hook them up to the OpenSSL or Crypto/STunnel APIs manually, that's all. Indy wraps the OpenSSL API natively, but its SSL architecture is abstracted so third-party SSL implementations (like SecureBlackBox) can be used. –  Remy Lebeau Oct 7 '11 at 18:07
    
@Remy would a "not a drop-in replacement" sound better? I had hard time trying to guess the right word, so I'll update an answer if this one sounds better or if you have a better suggestion for that word. –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Oct 7 '11 at 18:20
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that would sound better, yes. I updated your answer :-) –  Remy Lebeau Oct 7 '11 at 18:49

ICS from François Piette is a excellent open source library with SSL support.

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