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I have a string that looks like below, and I have to remove everything between the first bracket and the last bracket. All bets are off, on what's in between (regarding other brackets). What would be the best aproach, thanks.

'[

        { "foo":
            {"bar":"foo",
                "bar": {
                    ["foo":"bar", "foo":"bar"]
                }
            }
        }

    ],

"foo":"bar","foo":"bar"'

result:

  ',

    "foo":"bar","foo":"bar"'
share|improve this question
    
Your example data doesn't seem to be valid JSON. Was it supposed to be? The deviations are :- The inner most array is using pairs, so it should be an object.. AND The outermost scope seems to be a list, but it contains [] and pairs "":"" .. so it's not an object body or array body. -- is this the way you intended it? –  Nigel Thorne Nov 23 '11 at 21:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your data really does look like that and you don't have an brackets in the bit at the end then:

s.gsub(/\[.*\]/m, '')

If you want to be a little more paranoid, then you can look for ], followed by an end-of-line:

s.gsub(/\[.*\],$/m, ',')

Hard to say any more than that without a specification of your data format.

share|improve this answer
    
Darn, good observation, actually the bit at the end MAY have brackets. I have to find the corresponding close-bracket for the first open-bracket, and remove what's in between. Incidentally, this is json, but I can't treat it like a hash because the order matters. Total pain. So, this almost works, but what if i have brackets at the end? Thanks! –  dt1000 Oct 7 '11 at 20:00
    
@dt1000: But what you posted in your question is not JSON. You might want to update your question with real data (or at least valid fake data). I take it that fix the JSON producer to produce sensible JSON (i.e. ordered things are in arrays) is out of the question? –  mu is too short Oct 7 '11 at 20:38
    
@dt1000: Also, how exactly do you identify the part that you want to remove? –  mu is too short Oct 7 '11 at 20:47
    
not sure if this will be readable, but i am trying to remove the key "thingToRemove" and its value, thanks'{ "groupRateSDI":"0.125","groupRate":"0.55", "coverageLevels":[".5",".6" ], "thingToRemove": [ { "memberCoverage": {"formula":"Formulas.levelsMultiplier", "parameters": { "type":"memberCoverage" } } }, { "memberMaxIncrements": {"formula":"Formulas.maxIncrement", "parameters": { "type":"member", "incrementType":"salaryMultiplierCoverageArray" } } } ], "someKey":"800","someKey2":"180"}' –  dt1000 Oct 7 '11 at 21:29
    
@dt1000: Do you know the order that the keys should be in in the JSON? If you do then you could parse it as JSON, snip out the stuff you don't want, and then put it back into JSON format piece by piece. –  mu is too short Oct 9 '11 at 0:03

Here you go:

string.gsub(/\[.*\]/m, '')

You need to use the m flag for the . to match newline characters. .* is already greedy, so it will match any number of brackets in between.

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It's difficult to tell what you're trying to achieve, but that looks like JSON to me so it would probably be much easier to parse it and then manipulate it that way.

share|improve this answer
    
can't gotta keep the order. cant change the json. –  dt1000 Oct 7 '11 at 23:01

you need multi-line mode:

str.gsub(/\[.*\]/m, '')
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You could use something like Parslet to write a parser. Here's an example I wrote, based on the JSON grammer from http://www.json.org/

require 'parslet'

#This needs a few more 'as' calls to annotate the output 
class JSONParser < Parslet::Parser
  rule(:space)              { match('[\s\n]').repeat(1)}
  rule(:space?)             { space.maybe }
  rule(:digit)              { match('[0-9]') }
  rule(:hexdigit)           { match('[0-9a-fA-F]') }

  rule(:number)             { space? >> str('-').maybe >> 
                                (str('0') | (match('[1-9]') >> digit.repeat)) >> 
                                (str('.') >> digit.repeat).maybe >> 
                                ((str('e')| str('E')) >> (str('+')|str('-')).maybe >> digit.repeat ).maybe }

  rule(:escaped_character)  { str('\\') >> (match('["\\\\/bfnrt]') | (str('u') >> hexdigit.repeat(4,4))) }
  rule(:string)             { space? >> str('"') >> (match('[^\"\\\\]') | escaped_character).repeat >> str('"') }
  rule(:value)              { space? >> (string | number | object | array | str('true') | str('false') | str('null')) }

  rule(:pair)               { string >> str(":") >> value }
  rule(:pair_list)          { pair >> (space? >> str(',') >> pair).repeat }
  rule(:object)             { str('{') >> space? >> pair_list.maybe >> space? >> str('}') }

  rule(:value_list)         { value >> (space? >> str(',') >> value).repeat }
  rule(:array)              { space? >> str('[') >> space? >> value_list.maybe >> space? >> str(']') >> space?}

  rule(:json)               { value.as('value') >> (space? >> str(',') >> value.as('value')).repeat }
  root(:json)
end

# I've changed your doc to be a list of JSON values
doc = '[

        { "foo":
            {"bar":"foo",
                "bar": [
                    {"foo":"bar", "foo":"bar"}
                ]
            }
        }

    ],

{"foo":"bar"},{"foo":"bar"}'

puts JSONParser.new.parse(doc)[1..-1].map{|value| value["value"]}.join(",")
# => {"foo":"bar"},{"foo":"bar"} 

However as your document isn't valid JSON (as far as I know).. then you can change the above...

require 'parslet'

class YourFileParser < Parslet::Parser
  rule(:space)              { match('[\s\n]').repeat(1)}
  rule(:space?)             { space.maybe }
  rule(:digit)              { match('[0-9]') }
  rule(:hexdigit)           { match('[0-9a-fA-F]') }

  rule(:number)             { space? >> str('-').maybe >> 
                                (str('0') | (match('[1-9]') >> digit.repeat)) >> 
                                (str('.') >> digit.repeat).maybe >> 
                                ((str('e')| str('E')) >> (str('+')|str('-')).maybe >> digit.repeat ).maybe }

  rule(:escaped_character)  { str('\\') >> (match('["\\\\/bfnrt]') | (str('u') >> hexdigit.repeat(4,4))) }
  rule(:string)             { space? >> str('"') >> (match('[^\"\\\\]') | escaped_character).repeat >> str('"') }
  rule(:value)              { space? >> (string | number | object | array | str('true') | str('false') | str('null')) }

  rule(:pair)               { string >> str(":") >> value }
  rule(:pair_list)          { (pair|value) >> (space? >> str(',') >> (pair|value)).repeat }
  rule(:object)             { str('{') >> space? >> pair_list.maybe >> space? >> str('}') }

  rule(:value_list)         { (pair|value) >> (space? >> str(',') >> (pair|value)).repeat }
  rule(:array)              { space? >> str('[') >> space? >> value_list.maybe >> space? >> str(']') >> space?}

  rule(:yourdoc)           { (pair|value).as('value') >> (space? >> str(',') >> (pair|value).as('value')).repeat }
  root(:yourdoc)
end

doc = '[

        { "foo":
            {"bar":"foo",
                "bar": {
                    ["foo":"bar", "foo":"bar"]
                }
            }
        }

    ],

"foo":"bar","foo":"bar"'

puts YourFileParser.new.parse(doc)[1..-1].map{|value| value["value"]}.join(",")
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