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EDIT: I wasn't clear. I have to use reflection because I am interpreting from a command line. I am doing the reflection equivalent of the code examples I have provided.

hope this isn't a duplicate since it seems like an everyday thing to want to do.

I have a class A, and a class B that extends A. If I have a method in class C like public void doSomething(A a), how can I use reflection to pass a B object into this function? I want to do the (reflection) equivalent of:

B b = new B(); //B inherits from A
C c = new C();
c.doSomething(b); // method signature is doSomething(A a);

What I have done (using reflection) is: 1) get the Objects which are the arguments to the function. 2) get the Classes of the arguments 3) look up the method based upon the classes of the arguments. 4) invoke the method, passing in the argument Objects.

This works great if I were going to pass an A object into C.doSomething(...). However, if I am trying to pass a B object into C.doSomething(...) it fails on step 3, with this error:

java.lang.NoSuchMethodException: C.doSomething(B)

What is the appropriate way to get C.doSomething to recognize that B is an A? (when looking up a method using getDeclaredMethod(String name, Class... parameterTypes) and passing B.class in as the parameter type)

Thanks in advance

EDIT:

I'll post my own solution in case somebody wants to see one quickly hacked way of doing what Roland Illig suggested. In this example I reference these pre-made variables:

String methodToken; //the name of the method
Object obj; //the object whose method we are trying to call
Object[] args; //the user given arguments for the method
Class[] argTypes; //the types of the args gotten by args[i].getClass();

so...

    //*** try to get the specified method from the object


    Method m = null;

    // if we are looking for a no-arg version of the method:
    if(null == args)
    {
        try
        {
            m = obj.getClass().getMethod(methodToken, argTypes);
        }
        catch ( /*errors*/ )
        {
            // do stuff
        }
    }
    else // if we are looking for a version of the method that takes arguments
    {
        // we have to do this type of lookup because our user arguments could be 
        // subclasses of the arguments required by the method. getMethod will not
        // find a match in that case.
        try
        {
            boolean matchFound = false;
            Class c = obj.getClass();
            do
            {   // for each level in the inheritance hierarchy:

                // get all the methods with the right name 
                //(matching the name that the user supplied for the method)
                Method[] methodList = c.getMethods();
                ArrayList<Method> matchingMethods = new ArrayList<Method>();
                for( Method meth : methodList)
                {
                    if(meth.getName().equals(methodToken))
                    {
                        matchingMethods.add(meth); 
                    }
                }

                // check for a matching method signature
                for( Method meth : matchingMethods)
                {
                    // get the types of the arguments the method under
                    // investigation requires.
                    Class[] paramList = meth.getParameterTypes();

                    // make sure the signature has the required number of 
                    // elements. If not, this is not the correct method.
                    if(paramList.length != args.length)
                    {
                        continue;
                    }


                    // Now check if each method argument is assignable from the
                    // type given by the user's provided arguments. This means
                    // that we are checking to see if each of the user's 
                    // arguments is the same as, or is a superclass or 
                    // superinterface of the type found in the method signature
                    //(i.e. it is legal to pass the user arguments to this 
                    // method.) If one does not match, then this is not the 
                    // correct method and we continue to the next one.

                    boolean signatureMatch = false;
                    for ( int i = 0; i < paramList.length; ++i)
                    {
                        if(paramList[i].isAssignableFrom( argTypes[i] ) )
                        {
                            signatureMatch = true;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            continue;
                        }
                    }


                    // if we matched the signature on a matchingly named
                    // method, then we set the method m, and indicate 
                    // that we have found a match so that we can stop
                    // marching up the inheritance hierarchy. (i.e. the
                    // containing loop will terminate.
                    if(true == signatureMatch)
                    {
                        m = meth;
                        matchFound = true;
                        break;
                    }

                }

                // move up one level in class hierarchy.
                c = c.getSuperclass();
            }
            while(null != c && false == matchFound);
        }
        catch( /*errors*/)
        {
            // do stuff
        }
    }

    // check that m got assigned
    if(null == m)
    {
        System.out.println("From DO: unable to match method");
        return false;
    }

    // try to invoke the method !!!!
    try
    {
        m.invoke(obj, args);
    }
    catch ( /* errors */ )
    {
        // do stuff
    }

Hope it will help someone sometime! Thanks Roland!

share|improve this question
    
This should be working. If B is derived from A, it can be used anywhere an A object is expected. That's what polymorphism is all about. –  David R Tribble Oct 7 '11 at 19:04
    
The thing is, there is no method doSomething(B), only doSomething(A). How can the code know that it should call that method, since a perfectly matching method is not available? –  Roland Illig Oct 7 '11 at 19:09
1  
Note: read question carefully - it's about how to locate the correct method with reflection. –  Andy Thomas Oct 7 '11 at 19:09
    
I have to use reflection because I am making a command line interpreter. –  user487100 Oct 7 '11 at 19:12
    
I had to do this a long time ago and we ended up walking the inheritance tree for the object argument till we found a matching signature. This works ok for one argument but would be obscene for multiple. Note that this was back in JDK 1.2 days, I definitely wouldn't advise it for modern Java coding. –  Perception Oct 7 '11 at 19:16
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to follow the same process as outlined in the Java Language Specification, section 15.12 "Method Invocation Expressions", for finding the same method that would be found at compile time. In short, it's more complicated than you think.

A simple variant would be to check all the methods with the correct name (and don't forget the methods of all superclasses). For each of these methods, check whether all of your arguments are assignment-compatible to the corresponding method parameter. That might not be perfect, but works in most cases.

[Update:] The "simple variant" fails when there are multiple overloaded methods in a class. Here is some example code that you can play with:

package so7691729;

import static org.junit.Assert.*;

import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;
import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;

import org.junit.Test;

import com.google.common.collect.Maps;
import com.google.common.collect.Sets;

public class MethodCaller {

  private boolean isCompatible(Method m, Object... args) {
    Class<?>[] parameterTypes = m.getParameterTypes();
    if (parameterTypes.length == args.length) {
      for (int i = 0; i < args.length; i++) {
        if (args[i] != null) {
          if (!parameterTypes[i].isAssignableFrom(args[i].getClass())) {
            // TODO: make primitive types equivalent to their boxed types.
            return false;
          }
        }
      }
    } else {
      // TODO: maybe handle varargs methods here
      return false;
    }
    return true;
  }

  public Object call1(String fullyQualifiedMethodName, Object obj, Object... args) throws ClassNotFoundException, IllegalAccessException,
      InvocationTargetException {
    int lastDot = fullyQualifiedMethodName.lastIndexOf(".");
    String className = fullyQualifiedMethodName.substring(0, lastDot);
    String methodName = fullyQualifiedMethodName.substring(lastDot + 1);
    Class<?> clazz = Class.forName(className);

    for (Class<?> c = clazz; c != null; c = c.getSuperclass()) {
      Set<String> sameNameMethods = Sets.newTreeSet();
      Map<String, Method> compatibleMethods = Maps.newTreeMap();
      for (Method method : c.getDeclaredMethods()) {
        if (method.getName().equals(methodName)) {
          sameNameMethods.add(method.toString());
          if (isCompatible(method, args)) {
            compatibleMethods.put(method.toString(), method);
          }
        }
      }

      if (compatibleMethods.size() > 1) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Multiple candidates: " + compatibleMethods.keySet());
      }
      if (compatibleMethods.size() == 1) {
        return compatibleMethods.values().iterator().next().invoke(obj, args);
      }
      if (!sameNameMethods.isEmpty()) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Incompatible types for " + sameNameMethods);
      }
    }
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("No method found.");
  }

  public Object call(String fullyQualifiedMethodName, Object obj, Object... args) {
    try {
      return call1(fullyQualifiedMethodName, obj, args);
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
    } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
    } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
    }
  }

  public String str(Object obj) {
    return "object " + obj;
  }

  public String str(String str) {
    return "string " + str;
  }

  public int add(int a, int b) {
    return a + b;
  }

  @SuppressWarnings("boxing")
  public int addObj(Integer a, Integer b) {
    return a + b;
  }

  private void assertCallingError(String msg, String methodName, Object obj, Object... args) {
    try {
      call(methodName, obj, args);
      fail();
    } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
      assertEquals(msg, e.getMessage());
    }
  }

  @SuppressWarnings("boxing")
  @Test
  public void test() {
    MethodCaller dummy = new MethodCaller();
    assertEquals("object 1", call("so7691729.MethodCaller.str", dummy, 1));
    assertCallingError("Multiple candidates: " + //
        "[public java.lang.String so7691729.MethodCaller.str(java.lang.Object), " + //
        "public java.lang.String so7691729.MethodCaller.str(java.lang.String)]", //
        "so7691729.MethodCaller.str", dummy, "str");
    assertCallingError("Incompatible types for [public int so7691729.MethodCaller.add(int,int)]", "so7691729.MethodCaller.add", dummy, 3, 4);
    assertEquals(7, call("so7691729.MethodCaller.addObj", dummy, 3, 4));
    assertCallingError("Incompatible types for [public int so7691729.MethodCaller.addObj(java.lang.Integer,java.lang.Integer)]", "so7691729.MethodCaller.addObj", dummy, "hello", "world");
  }

}

And maybe the Java Beans specification or implementation has something for you. They may have had the same problem to solve. Or look at Rhino, a JavaScript implementation in pure Java. It lets you call Java methods directly from JavaScript code, so that is very similar to your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, nice answer. I recall an implementation somewhere in JINI (now Apache River). –  Andy Thomas Oct 7 '11 at 19:14
    
Thanks. I guess I was hoping that Method.invoke would check the superclasses of the arguments and verify that they meet the criteria of the method signature somewhere along the line. It seems like that would be easier than imposing the lookup burden on the programmer. Can you explain some times when the lookup solution you suggested would not be adequate? –  user487100 Oct 7 '11 at 19:14
    
I just added something to my answer. –  Roland Illig Oct 7 '11 at 20:49
    
Have a look at org.mozilla.javascript.NativeJavaMethod.findFunction(Context, MemberBox[], Object[]). It probably has exactly what you want. –  Roland Illig Oct 7 '11 at 20:56
    
Wow thanks for going through all that trouble with the code. I'm implementing a search function of my own right now. I will compare what I am doing to your code and look at the org.mozilla code. Thanks again. I'll just let the question hang for a bit before I accept the answer. –  user487100 Oct 7 '11 at 21:47
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3) look up the method based upon the classes of the arguments

You are asking the class: "Do you have any method with exactly this signature?" The class says "No!" You are not asking "Class, do you have something I can call with these parameters?" As already mentioned, this is not easy to answer as soon as inheritance and overloaded methods are involved and so the complete Reflection API does not address this issue.

However: You are not the first who wants a usable answer to the second question. Perhaps the MethodUtils.invokeMethod or any sibling from the Apache Commons Beanutils project is suitable for you.

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