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So, I have 12 lists and each of them contain 28 items with a value.

I am trying to maximize the value of the first list by switching items with the other 11 lists.

I can also trade different amounts of items. For example, I can trade 6 items from list 1 and 3 items from list 2. Or, I can trade 19 items from list 1 and 22 items from list 2. There are other items in a large pool that are not part of a list, so if a list receives more than 28 items the lowest values can easily be dropped, and if a list has less than 28 items then new items can easily be added.

However, one restriction is that I can only trade with one list at a time. For example, I can't trade 3 items from list 1 to list 2, trade 3 items from list 2 to list 3, and trade 3 items from list 3 to list 1. When I'm trading from list one, I can only trade with one single other list at a time.

I can obviously brute force this, but I feel like that would take forever. I'm not great with combinations, so I'm not exactly sure how many different combinations there would be if I wanted to brute force.

So my questions are, is brute forcing a feasible solution here, and if not, what's an example of an algorithm that could help me?

Thanks, Krzys.

EDIT:

Example:

List 1
[Apple - 12]
[Banana - 5]
[Orange - 8]

List 2
[Steak - 15]
[Chicken - 2]
[Fish - 7]

List 3
[Zebra - 20]
[Horse - 6]
[Elephant - 10]

So I'll start with list 1. This is what the program would do:

if (List1.Apple - List2.Steak < BestTradeAvailable) Then BestTradeAvailable = List1.Apple - List2.Steak
if (list1.Apple - List2.Chicken < BestTradeAvailable) Then BestTradeAvailable = list1.Apple - List2.Chicken
if (list1.Apple - list2.Fish < BestTradeAvailable) Then BestTradeAvailable = list1.Apple - list2.Fish
if (list1.Banana - List2.Steak < BestTradeAvailable) Then BestTradeAvailable = list1.Banana - List2.Steak
if (list1.Banana - List2.Chicken < BestTradeAvailable) Then BestTradeAvailable = list1.Banana - List2.Chicken
if (list1.Banana - List2.Fish < BestTradeAvailable) Then BestTradeAvailable = list1.Banana - List2.Fish

etc I also want to do multiple items at a time so:

if (list1.Apple + list1.Banana - List2.Steak + List2.Chicken < BestTradeAvailable) Then BestTradeAvailable = list1.Apple + list1.Banana - List2.Steak + List2.Chicken

But as I said before, you could trade one item from list 1 and 2 items from list 2:

if (list1.Apple - List2.Steak + List2.Chicken < BestTradeAvailable) Then BestTradeAvailable = List1.Apple - List2.Steak + List2.Chicken

So basically, I just want to try find the best trade available.

In this example, the best trade would be trading Apple + Orange to List3 for Zebra and Elephant, because this trade increase List1's total value by the highest amount.

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This question is impossible to understand. Work a small example for us with say, four lists each containing four items, demonstrating what quantity you are attempting to maximize. –  Eric Lippert Oct 7 '11 at 21:37
    
@EricLippert I'll work on an example. –  Krzys Czelusniak Oct 7 '11 at 21:39
    
So in your example, what is the best trade? What result would you expect the program to find in this case, and why? –  Eric Lippert Oct 7 '11 at 22:02
    
The best trade would be trading Apple + Orange to List3 for Zebra and Elephant, because this trade increase List1's total value by the highest amount. –  Krzys Czelusniak Oct 7 '11 at 22:05
    
Why does Apple/Orange for Zebra/Elephant work better than Banana/Orange for Zebra/Elephant? –  Eric Lippert Oct 8 '11 at 14:16
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2 Answers

Essentially you need to sort the lists and take the top 28?

Priority queues would work.

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A brute force solution would take only O(n^2 * (m-1)) time complexity where n is the number of items in the list and m is the number of lists. If you want to look for all combinations it would be O(n^2 * (n-1) * (m-1)) time complexity that would only be 232848 combinations you have to try. Or all combinations is n! if the order is important, too.

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Are you sure? From what I concluded by myself, using nCr, if I was picking 10 players from my total 28 that I was considering for trading with other teams, the number of combinations I can make with 10 players out of the 28 I have is 28C10, which is 13123110... –  Krzys Czelusniak Oct 7 '11 at 22:19
    
You said you want to maximize the trade off so you don't need to add the order of the items to the combinations. 28^10 is true when the order is important, too. –  Phpdna Oct 7 '11 at 22:29
    
Hang on, I thought nCr is purely for combinations, while nPr is the order of the items? If not, and you're answer is correct, then I'll definately just end up brute forcing this. –  Krzys Czelusniak Oct 8 '11 at 2:09
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