Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make a Vector3D class in my c++ application. For my entire program, I'm using a namespace. In this namespace I've declared my Vector3D class and an overloaded operator<< for it as such:

namespace space
{
    class Vector3D
    {
      public:
        float x, y, z;

        Vector3D(float _x = 0, float _y = 0, float _z = 0);
        Vector3D(const Vector3D & _vector);

        Vector3D & operator=(const Vector3D & _vector);
        Vector3D operator*(float _scalar);
        Vector3D operator*(const Vector3D & _vector); //CROSS PRODUCT

        float magnitude() const;
        float magnitude2() const; //FOR SPEED
        Vector3D normalize() const;
    };

    std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream &, const Vector3D &);
}

It compiles just fine too. My problem is to cout a Vector3D, I have to manually call

space::operator<<(cout, vector);

which is a pain. I'd like to try to avoid "using namespace space;", because I like the prefix on all the rest of the objects in "namespace space".

My final question: Is there any way to call an overloaded operator function inside a namespace without using that namespace?

Thanks for the help.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

My problem is to cout a Vector3D, I have to manually call space::operator<<(cout, vector);

You don't, that's what ADL (Argument-dependent name lookup, also known as Koenig's lookup) is about. It should be enough to do

cout << vector;

If it doesn't work, either you are working with an ancient compiler or you are doing something else wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm that's wierd... It must have been a makefile build issue. I rebuilt everything and it worked. Thanks :D –  roadkillguy Oct 7 '11 at 23:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.