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In C# 4.0 (or earlier if it can be done), how does a parent class pass a reference of itself to a child class. For example:

class Book
{

    public string bookname = "a";
    public static List<Page> pages = new List<Page>();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Page pageone = new Page("one");
        pages.Add(new Page("one"));
    }
}
public class Page
{
    Book book;
    public Page(string pagetitle)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(pagetitle);
        Console.WriteLine("I'm from bookname :?");
    }
}

How can I get Page to recognize which book it's in? I'm trying to pass the Book class in the constructor, but don't know how.

share|improve this question
    
C# and most object-oriented languages I know have no concept of parent class and child class. Not surprisingly, there's no built-in mechanism to pass a reference to the parent instance down to the child instance. –  John Saunders Oct 8 '11 at 1:04
    
@JohnSaunders Actually Java inner classes model exactly that kind of relation. Though you can easily fix it in C# - just a bit syntax sugar after all. –  Voo Oct 8 '11 at 1:07
    
@Voo, that's where I was coming from...but C# has nested classes as opposed to inner classes. see blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2006/08/01/685248.aspx –  user389823 Oct 8 '11 at 1:17
1  
@user389823 Yeah I know, otherwise I wouldn't have stated you have to implement it yourself in C#, would I? ;) But I wanted to point out at least one quite popular object oriented language that allows to model this easily. –  Voo Oct 8 '11 at 1:20
    
@John Saunders "Most" is debatable (even if this is the case with C#) ;-) –  user166390 Oct 8 '11 at 1:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're having trouble because you've made your book class the entry point for your application, which means you don't have an actual Book instance.

Try something like this instead:

public class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Book book1 = new Book();
        book1.AddPage("one");   
    }
}

public class Book
{
    public string Bookname = "a";
    public List<Page> Pages = new List<Page>();

    public void AddPage(string pageTitle)
    {
        Pages.Add(new Page(this, pageTitle));
    }
}

public class Page
{
    Book book;
    public Page(Book b, string pagetitle)
    {
        book = b;
        Console.WriteLine(pagetitle);
        Console.WriteLine("I'm from book '{0}'.", book.Bookname);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I shouldn't have made that class the entry point... –  user389823 Oct 8 '11 at 1:18

Just add a field for Book in the Page class

Then create an overload that takes a Book argument.

Use this to reference the Book object when calling the constructor from the Book class

private Book _book;
public Page(Book book, string pagetitle);
{
   this._book = book
}

// Usage in the Book class
Page pageone = new Page(this, "one");
share|improve this answer
    
this-keyword is not allowed, says VS2010 to me :( –  huan son Aug 3 '12 at 2:06

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