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So I want to create an Android app(s), but I dont own, or plan to get, an Android phone (due to Verizon's forced plans). Is there a way to buy an unlocked Droid or other android phone and use it as a test platform? If I just buy and unlocked phone with no plan or anything can I just plug it in and test the app?

I am buying in the US, and plan on buying one that comes unlocked

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This question is very country-specific, you should specify where you live. Also, buying a phone question probably belongs to "Android Enthusiasts" stack exchange web site, not here. –  haimg Oct 8 '11 at 1:37

3 Answers 3

yes. Just about any device you buy you can use for testing. Some of the carriers will sell you devices at full retail cost with out having you activate or sign up for any plan. You'll only have access to internet through wifi though. Which means your testing may not reflect the users experience is some cases.

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I'm not sure if my answer constitutes ads. But anyway, I feel my answer solves the problem.

Unlocked Droid on Newegg.com: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16875209212 Verizon-only contract-free Droid on Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Verizon-Motorola-A855-Android-contract/dp/tech-data/B0046NR5PK/ref=de_a_smtd

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Google Experience Devices are unlocked or unlockable where the vendor allows root access. Nexus One and Motorola Xoom are an example of such devices. Depending upon the unit, it could refer to subsidy unlocked which is another thing.

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Google no longer sells phones directly. If you know where they are available without plans, please add links. –  haimg Oct 8 '11 at 2:20
    
its called ebay, a used phone –  Taslem Oct 8 '11 at 2:23

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