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I would like to know what the return false statement does in this excerpt of HTML code. I don't understand why it isn't just the submit call. I would especially like to know WHERE false is being returned to. The excerpt is from:

http://www.autozone.com/autozone/storelocator/storeLocatorMain.jsp

<\a class="actionButton orange"
    onclick="document.storeLocatorForm.submit();return false;">
 <\span>SUBMIT<\/span>
<\/a>

I know it must have a simple answer but I haven't had much success googling it. I always get people asking much more complicated questions. I took the HTML and JavaScript tutorial at w3schools but it's been a while so I don't really remember how this fits in.

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return false in the context of a form submit handler will cancel the form submission before it is sent wherever it is meant to go. –  Jared Farrish Oct 8 '11 at 3:04
    
Also, your markup is not exactly making sense (elements typically don't have <\ to start off with). –  Jared Farrish Oct 8 '11 at 3:06
    
Yeah I know. When I copied and pasted it in I was in a hurry and I don't really know how to cancel it from interpreting the HTML in the post. Originally it just displayed SUBMIT. I added the slashes as a make-shift way to cancel the automatic interpretation of the HTML. –  Jaws212 Oct 8 '11 at 7:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Returning false in an event handler prevents the event from triggering the "default behavior" of the underlying control.

It's common to see this on links:

<a href='/something/useful' onClick='jsMagic();return false;'>
  link text
</a>

The on-click executes your function and then also prevents the user from navigating to /something/useful.

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Is it really common to see that? Why wouldn't jsMagic() just return false? –  Zach Rattner Oct 8 '11 at 4:58
    
If jsMagic() returned false, my example would have to be longer to illustrate the idea. –  Antoine Latter Oct 8 '11 at 5:03
    
That makes sense, but do you know why they might include that return false if there was no href value set? –  Jaws212 Oct 8 '11 at 7:48

There is a form somewhere on the page called StoreLocatorForm. When the link is clicked, it submits the form data and processes it however the function is programed to.

THe return:false; part is to keep it from not submitting before you actually click the link.

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