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I've generated a CA and multiple certificates (signed by CA) using OpenSSL and I have a .NET/C# client and server both using SslStream which each have their own certificates/keys, mutual authentication is enabled and revocation is disabled.

I'm using RemoteCertificateValidationCallback for SslStream to validate the remote server's certificate and I was hoping I could just load the CA's public certificate (as a file) in the program and use it to verify the remote certificate rather then actually installing the CA in the Windows Certificate Store. The problem is the X509Chain won't show anything else unless I install the CA into the store, either will the Windows CryptoAPI shell when I open a PEM version of one of the certificates.

My question is, how can I verify a certificate has been signed by my specific CA just by using the CA's public certificate file without using Windows certificate store or WCF when RemoteCertificateValidationCallback, X509Certificate and X509Chain don't seem to give me anything to work with?

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1  
I don't understand why adding the CA certificate to the Windows Store causes X509Chain to show it in the chain but if I don't it's not part of it. Is there someone to add the CA certificate to the chain within the RemoteCertificateValidationCallback? –  user985122 Oct 9 '11 at 6:41
    
I still can't find an answer to this :( –  user985122 Oct 27 '11 at 19:46

2 Answers 2

Because the CA certificate is NOT in the root certificate store, you will have within the RemoteCertificateValidationCallback() an error flag of SslPolicyErrors.RemoteCertificateChainErrors ; a possibility is to validate explicitely the certificate chain against your own X509Certificate2Collection, since you are not using the local store.

if (sslPolicyErrors == SslPolicyErrors.RemoteCertificateChainErrors)
{
    X509Chain chain0 = new X509Chain();
    chain0.ChainPolicy.RevocationMode = X509RevocationMode.NoCheck;
    // add all your extra certificate chain
    chain0.ChainPolicy.ExtraStore.Add(new X509Certificate2(PublicResource.my_ca));
    chain0.ChainPolicy.VerificationFlags = X509VerificationFlags.AllowUnknownCertificateAuthority;
    isValid = chain0.Build((X509Certificate2)certificate);
}

You can also re-use the chain passed in the callback, add your extra certificate(s) in the ExtraStore collection, and validate with the AllowUnknownCertificateAuthority flag which is needed since you add untrusted certificate(s) to the chain.

You could also prevent the original error by adding programmatically the CA certificate in the trusted root store (of course it opens a popup, for it is a major security problem to globally add a new trusted CA root) :

var store = new X509Store(StoreName.Root, StoreLocation.CurrentUser);
store.Open(OpenFlags.ReadWrite);
X509Certificate2 ca_cert = new X509Certificate2(PublicResource.my_ca);
store.Add(ca_cert);
store.Close();
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How can I verify a certificate has been signed by my specific CA just by using the CA's public certificate file without using Windows certificate store or WCF when RemoteCertificateValidationCallback, X509Certificate and X509Chain don't seem to give me anything to work with?

The following code will avoid the Windows certificate stores and validate the chain. Its a little different than JB's code, especially in the use of flags. The code below does not require AllowUnknownCertificateAuthority (but it does use X509RevocationMode.NoCheck since I don't have a CRL).

The name of the function does not matter. Below, VerifyServerCertificate is the same callback as RemoteCertificateValidationCallback in SslStream class. You can also use it for the ServerCertificateValidationCallback in ServicePointManager.

static bool VerifyServerCertificate(object sender, X509Certificate certificate,
    X509Chain chain, SslPolicyErrors sslPolicyErrors)
{
    try
    {
        String CA_FILE = "ca-cert.der";
        X509Certificate2 ca = new X509Certificate2(CA_FILE);

        X509Chain chain2 = new X509Chain();
        chain2.ChainPolicy.ExtraStore.Add(ca);

        // Check all properties
        chain2.ChainPolicy.VerificationFlags = X509VerificationFlags.NoFlag;

        // This setup does not have revocation information
        chain2.ChainPolicy.RevocationMode = X509RevocationMode.NoCheck;

        // Build the chain
        chain2.Build(new X509Certificate2(certificate));

        // Are there any failures from building the chain?
        if (chain2.ChainStatus.Length == 0)
            return true;

        // If there is a status, verify the status is NoError
        bool result = chain2.ChainStatus[0].Status == X509ChainStatusFlags.NoError;
        Debug.Assert(result == true);

        return result;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ex);
    }

    return false;
}

I have not figured out how to use this chain (chain2 below) by default such that there's no need for the callback. That is, install it on the ssl socket and the connection will "just work". And I have not figured out how install it such that its passed into the callback. That is, I have to build the chain for each invocation of the callback. I think these are architectural defects in .Net, but I might be missing something obvious.

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