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I have a class which creates a DOM element and has to capture all click events.

Simplified code:

function myClass()
{
  this.domElement = document.createElement("canvas");
  this.domElement.addEventListener("click", this.handleClick);
}
myClass.prototype.handleClick = function(evt)
{
  alert("Clicked!");
  // How to modify `this` object?
}

Now I want to modify some attributes and variables of the myClass instance in handleClick(). But this refers to the canvas object, of course.

Question: How can I access this of an object in an event handler?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This can be accomplished via closing over a reference to your instance and using apply to force the scope of a function:

In step 1 I have your example showing how this is the element which was clicked: http://jsfiddle.net/JAAulde/GJXpQ/

In step 2 I have an example which stores a reference to your instance in your constructor, then sets an anonymous function as the click handler and calls your click method off the stored reference. http://jsfiddle.net/JAAulde/GJXpQ/1/ This causes this within your click handler to be your instance and will work for you if you do not need access to the element which was clicked.

In step 3 I have stored the same reference, and used an anonymous function, but inside that function I grab the arguments which come into the anon function on click, I add the reference to the instance to those arguments, and I call the click handler in scope of the clicked element and pass the new set of arguments. http://jsfiddle.net/JAAulde/GJXpQ/2/ Using this methodology, inside the click handler I can access the clicked element via this, and the instance of myClass via instance.

I hope this helps. It can be quite confusing, so ask questions if needed.

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Many thanks for three solutions! I like best solution 2 (good and simple). But for which reason I need to access the original this? When I want to have access to the DOM element, I do it by evt.target. –  ComFreek Oct 9 '11 at 9:11
    
It's just a matter of preference and a matter of how the code is written. If you prefer 2 and use of evt.target that's legitimate. But if you were adapting some existing code you could end up in a situation where you needed a different scope, so 3 might work better in that situation. –  JAAulde Oct 9 '11 at 12:06
    
Okay, thanks. I'm writing my own framework, so there aren't any problems regarding this. Answer accepted ;) –  ComFreek Oct 9 '11 at 12:17

You can do it like this:

function myClass() {
  var self = this;

  this.domElement = document.createElement("canvas");
  this.domElement.addEventListener("click", function(evt){
      // use self here
  });
}

Since listener is actually a closure, it maintains reference to the variable self, which is object you're observing. Actual this, as you figured it out, references canvas element.

Another way that'd work, and keep methods seperated:

function myClass(){
  var self = this;

  this.domElement = document.createElement("canvas");
  this.domElement.addEventListener("click", function(evt){
    myClass.prototype.call(self, evt);
  });
}
myClass.prototype.handleClick = function(evt){
  alert("Clicked!");
  // How to modify `this` object?
}

Now this one uses Function.call and assigns what this references to.

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Thanks! I've updated the example to test the access to 'this': jsfiddle.net/StWu9. –  ComFreek Oct 9 '11 at 9:03

You could use .bind, which "freezes" the this value with a preset one: http://jsfiddle.net/TKAHg/.

.bind returns a new function which does the same thing as the original function, but it sets the this so that you can rely on it being the value you provided.

Although .bind is not available on older browsers, MDC has a shim for it.

// bind 'this' value inside handleClick when clicked
this.domElement.addEventListener("click", this.handleClick.bind(this));
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Thanks! I've updated the example, so the element is clickable: jsfiddle.net/TKAHg/1. Old browsers are no problem because I use the canvas element. But I need to support Opeara and Safari. –  ComFreek Oct 9 '11 at 8:59

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