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I have two arrays, one looks like:

["ssewweewewzad0xsis", "sasasaasasaas", "ddwdwd", "ffdfdfdffdfdf", "rffrfrfrfrfrrf", "rffrfrfrffrfrfrfbyzad0xsis
", "dsdssddssd", "ssdsddssd"]

The other looks like:

[
Array[8]
0: "ssdsddssd"
1: "dsdssddssd"
2: "rffrfrfrffrfrfrfbyzad0xsis↵"
3: "rffrfrfrfrfrrf"
4: "ffdfdfdffdfdf"
5: "ddwdwd"
6: "sasasaasasaas"
7: "ssewweewewzad0xsis"
length: 8
__proto__: Array[0]

(taken from the Developer Console in Chrome)

What are the differences between them and how can I check if they're the same?

The first one is from a parsed JSON, the second one is var array = new Array(); and its values are added through array.push().

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Is the second an array in an array? Does it show up as [ Array[8] ]? –  pimvdb Oct 8 '11 at 12:37
    
it shows up in the developer tools as p.fr.am/AXRu but I started learning jQuery a little time ago and I don't know exactly what is it –  pmerino Oct 8 '11 at 12:48
    
please post the code that copies from one to the other. –  Alnitak Oct 8 '11 at 13:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From your screenshot it appears that is an array inside an array.

To get the nested array, you can use theArray[0].

For example:

var arr  = [1, 2, 3], // shows up as [1, 2, 3]
    arr2 = [arr];     // shows up as [ Array[3] ] which you can expand
                      // with the arrow

Then:

arr2[0] === arr;

To compare, it depends on whether the arrays reference to the same thing.

If so, use arr2[0] === arr.

Otherwise, you can use one of the algorithms available on the internet. In Chrome, it's possible to do this as well:

var a = [1, 2, 3],
    b = [1, 2, 3];

a === b;          // false
a <= b && a >= b; // true
share|improve this answer

First check if both the arrays are of the same length. Then itertate through both and check if all the corresponding values are strictly equal (===).

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It'd also be a good idea to sort them first :-) –  Pointy Oct 8 '11 at 12:45
    
@Pointy a more fundamental question is why is the second instance reversed? –  Alnitak Oct 8 '11 at 13:03

Instead of a loop you can use join to compare the strings.

function checkArrays( arrA, arrB ){

    //check if lengths are different
    if(arrA.length !== arrB.length) return false;


    //slice so we do not effect the orginal
    //sort makes sure they are in order
    //join makes it a string so we can do a string compare
    var cA = arrA.slice().sort().join(""); 
    var cB = arrB.slice().sort().join("");

    return cA===cB;

}

var a = [1,2,3,4,5];
var b = [5,4,3,2,1];
var c = [1,2,3,4];
var d = [1,2,3,4,6];
var e = ["1","2","3","4","5"];  //will return true

console.log( checkArrays(a,b) );  //true
console.log( checkArrays(a,c) );  //false
console.log( checkArrays(a,d) );  //false
console.log( checkArrays(a,e) );  //true

Only problem is if you care about types which the last comparison tests. If you care about types, you will have to loop.

function checkArrays( arrA, arrB ){

    //check if lengths are different
    if(arrA.length !== arrB.length) return false;

    //slice so we do not effect the orginal
    //sort makes sure they are in order
    var cA = arrA.slice().sort(); 
    var cB = arrB.slice().sort();

    for(var i=0;i<cA.length;i++){
         if(cA[i]!==cB[i]) return false;
    }

    return true;

}

var a = [1,2,3,4,5];
var b = [5,4,3,2,1];
var c = [1,2,3,4];
var d = [1,2,3,4,6];
var e = ["1","2","3","4","5"];

console.log( checkArrays(a,b) );  //true
console.log( checkArrays(a,c) );  //false
console.log( checkArrays(a,d) );  //false
console.log( checkArrays(a,e) );  //false
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I interpret your question is actually asking "are these two structures actually equivalent" rather than asking the more generic question "how do I write code to compare two arrays".

The simple answer is that (with the possible exception of an incorrect two-level nesting) the two arrays are structurally the same. However for some reason one of the arrays is reversed.

How did you copy them? The simplest way is just this:

var copy = [];
for (var i = 0; i < orig.length; ++i) {
    copy.push(orig[i]);
}

or even more trivially:

var copy = [].concat(orig);

If instead you used the following (incorrect) code:

for (var i in orig) {
    copy.push(orig[i]);
}

then the enumeration order is not guaranteed, which may be why you've ended up with a reversed array.

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