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In my application, I have this code:

public class Couple
{
    public List<Role> Roles { get; set; };
    public Couple()
    {
        //How can I add the role in the constructor?
        //Is it correct to refer to the repository?
        //If so, this will impact on my EF Code First
    }
}

public class Role
{
    public string Name { get; set; };
}

public class DataContext : DbContext
{
    DbSet<Couple> Couples { get; set; }
    DbSet<Role> Roles { get; set; }
}

public interface IRepository
{
    void AddCouple(Couple couple);
}

public class Repository : IRepository
{
    DataContext db = new DataContext();

    public void AddCouple(Couple couple)
    {
        var role = (from r in db.Roles
                        where r.Name == "Couple"
                        select r).SingleOrDefault();

    couple.Roles.Add(role); //This is a correct place?
        db.Couples.Add(entity);

        db.SaveChanges();
    }
}

I also have a test project with a fake Repository:

public class FakeRepository : IRepository
{
    List<Couple> Couples = new List<Couple>();
    ListRole> Roles = new List<Role>();

    public void AddCouple(Couple couple)
    {
        var role = (from r in Roles
                        where r.Name == "Couple"
                        select r).SingleOrDefault();

        couple.Roles.Add(role);
        Couples.Add(entity);
    }
}

In Repository class in AddCouple method, I add the role. But I think that is not in correct place.

My question is where to place the logic, look in the role repository and populate the list of roles of the couple.

And being able to continue to build tests.

share|improve this question

The following line in your repository is problematic:

DataContext db = new DataContext();

It will prevent you from unit testing this class in isolation as you have strongly tied it to some specific data access class.

You could define an abstraction:

public interface IMyDataContext
{
    DbSet<Couple> Couples { get; set; }
    DbSet<Role> Roles { get; set; }
    int SaveChanges();
}

then provide some implementation:

public class DataContext : DbContext, IMyDataContext
{
    public DbSet<Couple> Couples { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Role> Roles { get; set; }
}

Now your repository should work only with the abstraction:

public class Repository : IRepository
{
    private readonly IMyDataContext _db;
    public Repository(IMyDataContext db)
    {
        _db = db;
    }

    public void AddCouple(Couple couple)
    {
        var role = (from r in _db.Roles
                    where r.Name == "Couple"
                    select r).SingleOrDefault();

        couple.Roles.Add(role); 
        _db.Couples.Add(entity);
        _db.SaveChanges();
    }
}

Now in your unit test you could use a mock framework to feed a fake context to the repository and be able to test it in isolation.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but even so, now my DbContext I'll have to duplicate logic: var role = (from r in _db.Roles where r.Name == "Couple" select r).SingleOrDefault(); couple.Roles.Add(role); I need to add a role to the couple before saving, but without duplicating code. I do not know where. – Ridermansb Oct 8 '11 at 14:39
    
@Riderman de Sousa Barbosa, I don't understand what duplication you are talking about. I thought you were asking about how to unit test your repositories in isolation. – Darin Dimitrov Oct 8 '11 at 14:40
    
To test the method AddCouple I need to centralize logic to add a Role. Otherwise it makes no sense to test the repository because the repository will behave fake repository and production will have another. See this code: var role = (from r in _db.Roles where r.Name == "Couple" select r). SingleOrDefault (); couple.Roles.Add (role); – Ridermansb Oct 8 '11 at 14:55
2  
@RidermandeSousaBarbosa, normally repositories should contain only simple CRUD operations on your business entities. You should have a service layer aggregating multiple repositories where you would define more complex operations. – Darin Dimitrov Oct 8 '11 at 14:57
1  
@RidermandeSousaBarbosa, a service layer is useful when you have complex business operations with your entities. – Darin Dimitrov Oct 8 '11 at 15:02

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